St Mary's Priory, Old Malton

Old Malton, United Kingdom

The only remaining Gilbertine church still in regular use. The Gilbertines were the only English Monastic order, founded by Gilbert of Sempringham about 1131. Gilbert, born a cripple, died aged 106 in 1190, and was declared a saint within twelve of years of his death by Pope Alexander III. The Book of Gilbert, detailing the evidence by which he was made a saint still survives. Unlike almost every other monastic order, the Gilbertines had both men and women, and most of their houses were double houses, with both Priors and Nuns.

Old Malton Priory, founded 1149, was one of the few houses which was for Priors only. Following the death of Gilbert, it became the headquarters of the order for about 50 years. Despite the poverty of the order, it was one of the very last monasteries to be closed during the dissolution of the monateries, in 1539. Today, the church is less than a quarter of its original size, but is still a spectacular building both outside and in, with some mediaeval misericords, and also remains from an earlier saxon church on the site.

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Details

Founded: 12th Century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.stmarysmalton.org.uk

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Colley (14 months ago)
This is an incredible building if you've got opportunity to visit!
Chris J Lock (17 months ago)
A wonderful family funeral held here. Very comforting!
Allyson Morris (17 months ago)
My sons funeral and rev Glyn was brilliant.
Ray Watson (2 years ago)
Lovely Church very peaceful
Peter (2 years ago)
Married here and said goodbye to a few folks here too. Lovely little church
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