Romnes Church

Nome, Norway

Romnes church was probably built at the end of the 12th century or the beginning of the 13th century, and was dedicated to St. Lawrence. The interior of the church is from the period after the reformation (1735). Altarpiece, pulpit, font, candlesticks etc. were given to the church by private families in the period 1700-1760.

he wooden fence that earlier surrounded the church and cemetery, was in 1931-32 replaced by the stone wall you see today. Built by the last stone masons guild in Telemark. During the last world war, the home guard used the roof over the front gate as a hiding place for arms and explosives.

n 1723 dean Alstrup from Bamble bought the church from the king Fredrik IV. Later owners were the families Løvenskiold, Cappelen and Aall. When the parish took over the church in 1986 Romnes was the only church in private ownership in Norway.

n the winter,- the church is too cold to use. In the summer however, the church is used for funerals, weddings and sunday services.

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Address

Løkkabakken 15, Nome, Norway
See all sites in Nome

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

www.holla.no
www.kirkesok.no

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gunnar Kleiva (4 years ago)
I have lived in Lunde / Flåbygd for 31 years, I liked it very much.
Camilla olsen (5 years ago)
Pretty nice church Nice around the tombs too
valentina pasina (5 years ago)
Good cozy place
Tor Einar Rykkelid (6 years ago)
Good experience
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