Daugavpils Fortress

Daugavpils, Latvia

Daugavpils Fortress, also known as Dinaburg Fortress is the only early 19th century military fortification of its kind in Northern Europe that has been preserved without significant alterations. For a long time it was a defense base of the western frontier of the Russian Empire. Planning of the fortress began in 1772 by decree of Tsar Alexander I of Russia, shortly after the First Partition of Poland when Latvia ceded to Russia and construction began during Napoleon"s attack of the Russian Empire in 1810. In 1812, the fortress was attacked by the French Army of 24,000 men. The fortress was still under construction and was defended by 3300 men and 200 cannons.

Construction of the fortress, despite lengthy delays, serious floodings and slow construction work, was completed in 1878. Latvian independence was officially recognised by Soviet Russia in 1920 and between 1920 and 1940 the fortress became home of the Latvian army. During World War II, the hostage camp Stalag 340 was set up in the fortress.

Today fortress is the site of the Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art centre.

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Details

Founded: 1772-1878
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justin Raz (3 months ago)
Spooky place. During winter time really empty place, has little visitors.
Edgar Kidulis (5 months ago)
It's definitely a place to visit while in Daugavpils.
Anatolijs Vjalihs (8 months ago)
One of the largest fortresses in Europe. Great place to explore the history, architecture, art and nature. Mystic and romantic place. Highly recommend to everyone: families, couples, etc.
Raitis (8 months ago)
The perfect mix of strange, spooky yet safe. Perfect to ride around on bike.
Mauri Randma (8 months ago)
No open hours posted, got locked in and had to travel all around the territory to get to our car. Otherwise nice, great potential but sadly unrealised.
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