Daugavpils Fortress

Daugavpils, Latvia

Daugavpils Fortress, also known as Dinaburg Fortress is the only early 19th century military fortification of its kind in Northern Europe that has been preserved without significant alterations. For a long time it was a defense base of the western frontier of the Russian Empire. Planning of the fortress began in 1772 by decree of Tsar Alexander I of Russia, shortly after the First Partition of Poland when Latvia ceded to Russia and construction began during Napoleon"s attack of the Russian Empire in 1810. In 1812, the fortress was attacked by the French Army of 24,000 men. The fortress was still under construction and was defended by 3300 men and 200 cannons.

Construction of the fortress, despite lengthy delays, serious floodings and slow construction work, was completed in 1878. Latvian independence was officially recognised by Soviet Russia in 1920 and between 1920 and 1940 the fortress became home of the Latvian army. During World War II, the hostage camp Stalag 340 was set up in the fortress.

Today fortress is the site of the Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art centre.

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Details

Founded: 1772-1878
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul (10 months ago)
Aside the massive and quite beautiful door, the fortress is not very interesting. I was confused to see some russian-style buildings inside the fortress, I was expecting more historic buildings and things to see.
Laima Nandi (11 months ago)
Amazing old area of militaries (from beginning of 19th century), huge territory. Buildings are partially renovated, only a few. Minus was that there are no signs where is what located, where are the most famous places like Rothko art Center. One have to discover himself. There are no explanatory signs with history information unfortunately. We read before in visitdaugavpils site, it was good. Place was almost empty in November Sunday day.
Basilica Kolegovs (13 months ago)
Many Layers of history with future horizonts...excelent experiance
Arnis Veidemanis (13 months ago)
Interesting that 1000 peaople are still living there. Theres is small micro village. Rotko was close in Monday, but must see is you are there!
Sabir Ilyasov (13 months ago)
Quiet place in Latvia!!
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