Sandavágur Church is a distinctive red-roofed church built in 1917. A memorial was erected outside the church to one of the many ships that were sunk during the Second World War.

The church is known for its runestone. The inscription on the Sandavágur stone tells that the Norwegian Torkil Onandarson from Rogaland was the first settler on this place. It is believed to be dated back to the 13th century.

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Founded: 1917
Category: Religious sites in Faroe Islands

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Madel Tejano (2 years ago)
A beautiful church to visit. Especially at night when lights is on around it its awesome view. Located just near the beach as well.
Ing. Ján Vangor (2 years ago)
Nice place with historic feeling :)
Reagan Enid (2 years ago)
Beautiful
Valentyna Inshyna (3 years ago)
Must see sight in Sandavagur. And what a uniquely lovely church it is, painted in pastel colours with a choir gallery, a fresco, flowers painted on the panelling, and model ship hanging from the ceiling (a tradition in seafaring communities throughout Europe). It felt cared for light and welcoming.
beergal hkwriter (3 years ago)
my friend said this is the most beautiful church he's ever seen, for me it's ok... you'll pass by this town on the way to trælanípa.
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