Skansin is a historic fortress located on a hill beside the port of Tórshavn. The fort was built in 1580 by Magnus Heinason to protect against pirate raids of the town, after he himself was nearly caught up in one such raid. The fort was expanded considerably in 1780 and went through a series of rebuilds for many years afterwards. During the Second World War the fort served Britain as a military base. Two guns date from the British occupation, standing along with many older Danish cannons.

One of the Faroese lighthouses, the Skansin Lighthouse, towers over the fortress, pointing the way to the capital. The strategic location of the fort offers tourists picturesque views of Tórshavn port, surrounding landscape and views out towards Nólsoy island.

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Founded: 1580
Category: Castles and fortifications in Faroe Islands

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

閑良 간종쿨성발 (3 years ago)
nice view and find easy
Themos Maounis (3 years ago)
When visited during working hours the visitors center was closed. Other visitors who were in urged us to climb the fence to get in. We entered through a gate that was easy to open. Relatively abandoned place. Not much to see from inside Driving by you can see the place
Stefan Nordendal (3 years ago)
Is a nice quiet place, with a good view
Mark Lawrence McRay (3 years ago)
Awesome Viking outpost with an English WWII gun emplacement and lighthouse, green grass roofs, very classic Nordic place.
Lars Giel (3 years ago)
Smart Business. Everything is perfect.
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