Borre mound cemetery (Borrehaugene) is an exceptional large area of burial mounds in Scandinavia. Today, seven large mounds and one cairn can be seen. At least two mounds and one cairn have been destroyed in modern times. There are also 25 smaller cairns and the cemetery may have been larger. Some of the monuments are over 45m in diameter and up to 6m high. Borrehaugene provides important historical knowledge and can be seen as evidence that there was a local power center from the Merovingian period to the Viking age.

The first investigations of the cemetery took place in 1852. Local road-builders used one of the mounds as a gravel-pit and in the process destroyed large parts of a richly equipped grave in a Viking ship. Antiquarian Nicolay Nicolaysen examined what was left of the mound. The grave contained weapons and riding equipment suggesting it was a man's grave. The excavations uncovered an unusually good selection of craft work, much of which is on display at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo.

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Address

Birkelyveien 5, Borre, Norway
See all sites in Borre

Details

Founded: 600-900 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

camilla skilnand (2 years ago)
Amazing nature and breathtaking Viking hills. In summer grassing sheep, in pens around the grounds.
Kjetil Raaen (2 years ago)
One of the most important collections of Viking monuments anywhere.
Carl-Inge Svingeseth (2 years ago)
Great place for arrangements from the viking era
Nadia Rønningen (2 years ago)
National park with viking history among the threes
Simon Lidwell (2 years ago)
Modern, well laid out exhibition with a solid archaeological base. A great combination of woodland and high tech! Cafe not open all year round.
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