Fredrikstad Fortress

Fredrikstad, Norway

Fredrikstad fortress was constructed between 1663-1666 by the officer Willem Coucheron and his son Anthony Coucheron following the order of the Dano-Norwegian King Frederick II. A temporary fortification had previously been built on the site during the Torstenson War (1644-1645) between Sweden and Denmark-Norway.

The first commander was appointed 6 January 1662; he was Lieutenant Colonel Johan Eberhard Speckhan. Besides the fortress the prison works was also under the supervision of the commander of Fredrikstad fortress. In 1716 the fortress was used by the naval hero Peder Tordenskjold when he attacked the Swedish fleet during the Battle of Dynekilen.

The only time the fortress were attacked was during the Swedish-Norwegian War (1814). The fortress, under the command of Nils Christian Frederik Hals, capitulated on 4 August 1814. The fortress was closed in 1903, but continued to serve as a garrison. Fredrikstad fortress is unique in Norway by being the only fortress that is preserved as it was. The remaining military installations in Fredrikstad were closed in 2002 and today the fortress with its mix of old buildings and art exhibitions is very popular for visitors.

The fortifications in Fredrikstad include Kongsten fort, Isegran fort, Cicignon fort, Huth fort, Akerøya fort and Slevik battery.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1663-1666
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

SteV R (13 months ago)
A very interesting place. It was fortune, that we stay a night here and we were absolutely surprised of the surroundings. Many ways to walk and you also get the chance to learn something about the history.
Evert Meulie (2 years ago)
A beautiful, quiet historical landmark. When I visited yesterday with my son we were the only ones there. Great views of Fredrikstad from the walls.
Leo Starr (2 years ago)
Everytime I go I enjoy itmoreand more. The change of seasons and all the beauty within... If I move here soon im gonna ask them for a job. These are pano shoots with all the forts within . look close and I will see...
Oktay Ahmed (3 years ago)
Must see in the city.
AUM (3 years ago)
nah dawg
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.