Kolomna Kremlin

Kolomna, Russia

Kolomna Kremlin was built between 1525–1531 by the order of Vasily III to imitate the Moscow Kremlin and was equal to it in both size and beauty. On the territory of the Kolomna Kremlin there are the Dormition Cathedral (17th century), Tikhvinsky Cathedral, built in pseudo-Russian style, as well as the Novo-Golutvin and Brusensky monasteries, the Trinity Church, the Cross Cathedral and other historic buildings.

Kolomna Kremlin is surrounded by a brick wall, which was erected by the orders of Vasily III. Previously, it had 17 towers and four of them had gates. Of all the towers only six have survived. Only surviving gate is a Pyatnitsky Gate, which had once served as the main entrance to the city. The names of most towers of Kolomna Kremlin coincide with the Moscow’s. For example, it also has the Faceted Tower, so named because of its shape – rectangular from the inside, hexagonal on the outside. Now it is the Museum of Ancient Russian Martial Art.

In the center of the Kremlin there is the five-domed Dormition Cathedral rebuilt in 1672-1682 on the site of the former white stone building of Dmitry Donskoy’s time. To the north of the cathedral there stands a small Church of Resurrection. Earlier, it was connected with the palace. According to the legend, there, Dmitry Donskoy and Suzdal Princess Eudoxia were married. Brusensky monastery is no less interesting. It is the place of the revered Kazan icon of Our Lady, which, according to legend, is one of the direct copies of the miraculous Kazan icon. The monastery was founded around the tent-roofed church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, built in the 16th century by the orders of Ivan the Terrible to mark the capture of Kazan.

Particularly attractive for tourists is the so-called Marinkina Tower. This is the tallest tower in Kolomna. Its height is 31 meters, the diameter - about 13 meters. From the distance it looks round, although in reality it is decorated with 20 facets. On the top of it there are decorative loopholes. The eighth floors have 27 windows arranged in checkerboard pattern. It used to be the watchtower. The folk legend runs that in the time of the Great Troubles the wife of False Dmitry II, Marina Mnishek, was held prisoner. Allegedly, she hid the great treasures there. Unfortunately, Kolomna Kremlin has reached us in a sad condition. Only two fragments of the walls and 7 towers have survived. Once the stronghold protecting the city from enemy invasions, the mighty fortress could not defeat the time.

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Details

Founded: 1525-1531
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Jackson MacFarland (15 months ago)
very good, here is the legendary trio(eman101203, real neel, and shamos normal form.) Glory to the motherland.
Roman D. (16 months ago)
An important piece of Russian history. A must see.
321conquer (2 years ago)
Cool. Unfortunately we could not succeed with the wall and tower visit...
Ivan Ristic (2 years ago)
Wonderful place! Was there already twice.....and will continue to visit Kolomna
Nick Dempers (2 years ago)
Kolomna is a fantastic historical town close to Moscow that is definitely worth a visit. The Kolomna Kremlin is a nice old town with remnants of the fortress. There are some nice churches and some interesting museums in the kremlin.
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