Bederkesa Castle

Bederkesa, Germany

Bederkesa is a medieval castle built originally in the 12th century. Its original owners, the counts of Bederkesa, lost their fief in 1381. For more than two centuries, the City of Bremen became owner of this castle and its surrounding subjects. As a symbol of sovereignty, they have constructed a Roland statue which is still standing in front of castle. Until 1859, this castle served as administrative centre of its surrounding area. In 1881, it was sold to local investors who converted it into a hotel. This hotel, however, became ramshackle and was deemed to demolition, when the local county administration bought it in 1975, spending much money for reconstruction. Since 1982, the castle serves as museum of local archeology. Remains of prehistoric and medieval houses have been dug from three abandoned villages, Fallward, Feddersen and Flögeln. These Anglo-Saxons moved to England around 450 AD and left their villages uninhabited.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Günther Claassen (7 months ago)
A beautiful place.
Taira Kelenius (12 months ago)
Cute little museum. Worth seeing for anyone interested in archeology. The castle from the outside is great, a nice playground and a lake right next door. And also a few places to eat. The ladies at the cash register were also super friendly and helpful. Thanks for that!
Taira Kelenius (12 months ago)
Cute little museum. Worth seeing for anyone interested in archeology. The castle from the outside is great, a nice playground and a lake right next door. And also a few places to eat. The ladies at the cash register were also super friendly and helpful. Thanks for that!
Jens Wilkens (12 months ago)
Very nice outside. It was just lunch break when we got there and we didn't want to wait. When we are back in bathroom B we will go back and look at the interior.
Lou Nase (14 months ago)
It's a shame that you are not allowed in with your dog. It would be advisable to put a note on the website so that a long journey can be avoided. Very annoying when this is free! We weren't the only ones with a dog that day. But there is no star for the fact that no dogs are allowed, but for the absolute rudeness of the lady at the entrance! If you are so dissatisfied with your own life, maybe you shouldn't work in a job where you come into contact with other people! If you are snapped at like that after a polite question, you just want to get away quickly. A real shame. Otherwise we would have liked to go there another time without a dog. But not like that!
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The Palace of the Kings of Navarre of Olite was one of the seats of the Court of the Kingdom of Navarre, since the reign of Charles III 'the Noble' until its conquest by Castile (1512). The fortification is both castle and palace, although it was built more like a courtier building to fulfill a military function.

On an ancient Roman fortification was built during the reign of Sancho VII of Navarre (13th century) and extended by his successors Theobald I and Theobald II, which the latter was is installed in the palace in 1269 and there he signed the consent letter for the wedding of Blanche of Artois with his brother Henry I of Navarre, who in turn, Henry I since 1271 used the palace as a temporary residence. This ancient area is known as the Old Palace.

Then the palace was housing the Navarrese court from the 14th until 16th centuries, Since the annexation (integration) of the kingdom of Navarre for the Crown of Castile in 1512 began the decline of the castle and therefore its practically neglect and deterioration. At that time it was an official residence for the Viceroys of Navarre.

In 1813 Navarrese guerrilla fighter Espoz y Mina during the Napoleonic French Invasion burned the palace with the aim to French could not make forts in it, which almost brought in ruin. It is since 1937 when architects José and Javier Yarnoz Larrosa began the rehabilitation (except the non-damaged church) for the castle palace, giving it back its original appearance and see today. The restoration work was completed in 1967 and was paid by the Foral Government of Navarre.