The Great Tower Neuwerk is the most significant building of the Neuwerk island, belonging to Hamburg. This former beacon, watchtower and lighthouse is also the oldest building in Hamburg and oldest secular building on the German coast.

The construction was started in 1300. It was completed after ten years in 1310. The style matches the common norman tower type of the time. Contrary to some literature, the tower was built in this form from the beginning. The fire in the 1360s destroyed most of the wooden elements and it had to undergo major reconstruction.

The original roof was made of lead, and was replaced by copper in 1474. This was again replaced in 1558 by a tiled roof and by a new copper roof following that. The copper was then used for military purposes in 1916 reconstructed later.

The original purpose was to host troops to defend the ships entering and leaving the Elbe from sea and beach pirates. The tower was also refuge for the farmers on the island during storm surges and survivors of shipwrecks over the centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1300-1310
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

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User Reviews

Hans Wurst (14 months ago)
Mit dem Wattwagenfahrern nach Neuwerk ist ein bezaubernde Abenteuer für Jung und Alt nämlich, besonders am sonnigen Tagen wird es auch Mal Lustig hergehen!
Jan Jannos (16 months ago)
Wer einmal über Kilometer auf dem Meeresgrund herum laufen möchte sollte eine Wattwanderung nach Neuwerk machen. Die Nordsee verschwindet im Rhythmus der Gezeiten.
MANFRED OLßON (2 years ago)
Tolle Zimmer und Aussicht. Ich fühlte mich gleich aufgenommen und wie in einer Familie. Das Frühstück war gut, der Kaffee exelent, ich werde auch beim nächsten Besuch dort einkehren. Einfach genial diese Atmosphäre.
Ma Ha (2 years ago)
Wenn man nicht gerade zu Fuß durchs Watt nach Neuwerk gewandert ist, lohnen sich die rund 140 Stufen hinauf auf jeden Fall noch für den Blick. Und die Wanderung durchs Wattenmeer sollte man in der Tat auch mal gemacht haben...
Guillem Mas (2 years ago)
Group dinner. Too slow service. No cold water in the table.
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