Pipo Castle in Ozora is a unique piece of Italian Renaissance in a small Hungarian village. The castle was built for Filippo Scolari, otherwise known as Pipo of Ozora, who came to Hungary as a merchant’s clerk/assistant when he was 13 years old and rose to become a renowned economist, a brilliant soldier and a distinguished diplomat at the 15th century court of King Sigismund.

The castle contains important Renaissance furniture, fabrics and travelling trunks. Its courtyard features a fountain that is topped with a copy of a Verrocchio putto, while one of the walls boasts a reproduction of a Michelangelo relief. A relic of St George is to be found treasured in the chapel. The reconstructed Renaissance kitchen provides a fascinating glimpse into the world of medieval Hungarian kitchens, of victuallers, cooks and servants. The armoury houses a splendid display of replica weapons from the Sigismund period. Outstanding copies of works by the great masters of the Italian Renaissance, Verrocchio, Donatello and Michelangelo, are to be found in the knights’ hall. The castle is also home to a richly documented exhibition on the life of Illyés Gyula, a famous 20th century Hungarian poet and novelist.

Visitors to the castle can get an insight into the life of the 14–15th centuries. There is also possible to stay in a historic apartment as a special guest.

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Address

Várhegy utca 27, Ozora, Hungary
See all sites in Ozora

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Boris Ristovski (2 years ago)
The object is very beautiful, but I did not entered inside. The surrounding makes this building even more attractive.
Balázs Sebestyén (2 years ago)
Nice place
Attila Demko (3 years ago)
Very nice medieval architecture. A real surprise.
Peter Tihanyvari (4 years ago)
Nicely restored, tastefully redone interiors. Worth a visit if you are in the area.
Tibor Bánky (4 years ago)
It's a big fun and adventure to live in a medieval castle. Ozora is wonderful and the girls, who care it are wise and lovely. The "Ágota" apartment was confortable and authentic. I enjoyed the kind hospitality. The exhibition is spectacular and professional, the guide was very smart.
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