Pipo Castle in Ozora is a unique piece of Italian Renaissance in a small Hungarian village. The castle was built for Filippo Scolari, otherwise known as Pipo of Ozora, who came to Hungary as a merchant’s clerk/assistant when he was 13 years old and rose to become a renowned economist, a brilliant soldier and a distinguished diplomat at the 15th century court of King Sigismund.

The castle contains important Renaissance furniture, fabrics and travelling trunks. Its courtyard features a fountain that is topped with a copy of a Verrocchio putto, while one of the walls boasts a reproduction of a Michelangelo relief. A relic of St George is to be found treasured in the chapel. The reconstructed Renaissance kitchen provides a fascinating glimpse into the world of medieval Hungarian kitchens, of victuallers, cooks and servants. The armoury houses a splendid display of replica weapons from the Sigismund period. Outstanding copies of works by the great masters of the Italian Renaissance, Verrocchio, Donatello and Michelangelo, are to be found in the knights’ hall. The castle is also home to a richly documented exhibition on the life of Illyés Gyula, a famous 20th century Hungarian poet and novelist.

Visitors to the castle can get an insight into the life of the 14–15th centuries. There is also possible to stay in a historic apartment as a special guest.

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Address

Várhegy utca 27, Ozora, Hungary
See all sites in Ozora

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ferenc Deak (10 months ago)
Hidden gem South from Balaton, rich exhibition, nice TourGuide, good parking!
Arpad Kovacs (13 months ago)
Best tourguide we ever came across, fantastic value, seriously friendly and helpful staff, we arrived with a motorcycle and they simply accommodated our luggage and helmets. We will be back and rent a room for a few nights for sure
Flórián “vflorian2000” Vámosi (2 years ago)
Visited on Hungarian National Holiday, 23 October so entry was free. The castle is nicely renovated, there is a nice little cafe and rooms are also available.
Sara Gyimesi (2 years ago)
I love the place, nice exposition, beautiful castle garden, unforgettable experience to rent out a whole castle with friends.
Hannah Lénárt (2 years ago)
Pretty little renesasaince castle in the heart of Hungary. The guided tour is part of the entry fee.
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