Dömötör Tower

Szeged, Hungary

The Dömötör tower is the oldest building in Szeged. The foundation was most probably laid during the 11th century, while the lower part was built (in Romanesque style) from the 12th century, and the upper part (Gothic style) from the 13th century. The tower was once part of the former St. Demetrius church, but today it stands in Dóm Square, in front of the much larger Votive Church of Szeged. The upper part was rebuilt from the original stones in 1926. The architecture of the tower is similar to another found in Southern France, or in the territory of the former Byzantine Empire.

On the upper part, there are 48 pointed windows in three levels (sixteen on each level, two on every side of the octagonal levels). On the lower part, a gate was cut and turned to a baptismal chapel in 1931.

Inside the tower, there is a fresco by Vilmos Aba-Novák of the baptism of Hungarians in the 11th century. Due to the mould growing on the rear wall, the baptismal chapel is no longer in use.

The tower's 'Gate of Life' was made by János Bille in 1931 and explains a Christian life through symbols. At the top and at the bottom, there are two numbers: 1272 and 1931. The former was thought to represent the year in which the upper part was built, while 1931 is when it was turned to a baptismal chapel.

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Address

Dóm tér 6, Szeged, Hungary
See all sites in Szeged

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Gabor Jankovics (22 months ago)
Place to see
ukwuomah tochukwu (2 years ago)
One of famous places in szeged
Sebastjan Ugrin (2 years ago)
An interesting building made of bricks in front of the votive cathedral. Unfortunately it was closed when we were in the neighbourhood.
Jáchym Šlik (3 years ago)
Oldest building in Szeged.
Andre Marotto (4 years ago)
The Tower, and the church and the square surrounding it, are all worth seeing.
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