Dömötör Tower

Szeged, Hungary

The Dömötör tower is the oldest building in Szeged. The foundation was most probably laid during the 11th century, while the lower part was built (in Romanesque style) from the 12th century, and the upper part (Gothic style) from the 13th century. The tower was once part of the former St. Demetrius church, but today it stands in Dóm Square, in front of the much larger Votive Church of Szeged. The upper part was rebuilt from the original stones in 1926. The architecture of the tower is similar to another found in Southern France, or in the territory of the former Byzantine Empire.

On the upper part, there are 48 pointed windows in three levels (sixteen on each level, two on every side of the octagonal levels). On the lower part, a gate was cut and turned to a baptismal chapel in 1931.

Inside the tower, there is a fresco by Vilmos Aba-Novák of the baptism of Hungarians in the 11th century. Due to the mould growing on the rear wall, the baptismal chapel is no longer in use.

The tower's 'Gate of Life' was made by János Bille in 1931 and explains a Christian life through symbols. At the top and at the bottom, there are two numbers: 1272 and 1931. The former was thought to represent the year in which the upper part was built, while 1931 is when it was turned to a baptismal chapel.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Dóm tér 6, Szeged, Hungary
See all sites in Szeged

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrian Niculae (2 years ago)
Nice place to visit.
Joe Daou (5 years ago)
Amazing architecture and arts
Gabor Jankovics (5 years ago)
Place to see
ukwuomah tochukwu (6 years ago)
One of famous places in szeged
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Doune Castle

Doune Castle was originally built in the thirteenth century, then probably damaged in the Scottish Wars of Independence, before being rebuilt in its present form in the late 14th century by Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany (c. 1340–1420), the son of King Robert II of Scots, and Regent of Scotland from 1388 until his death. Duke Robert"s stronghold has survived relatively unchanged and complete, and the whole castle was traditionally thought of as the result of a single period of construction at this time. The castle passed to the crown in 1425, when Albany"s son was executed, and was used as a royal hunting lodge and dower house.

In the later 16th century, Doune became the property of the Earls of Moray. The castle saw military action during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms and Glencairn"s rising in the mid-17th century, and during the Jacobite risings of the late 17th century and 18th century.