The Breisacher Stephansmünster is a Romanesque-Gothic church and landmark of the town of Breisach am Rhein. The church dates from the 12th century and was expanded and remodelled to the Gothic style in the 15th century. The construction time is not precisely known. It was probably started after 1185 and completed in 1230. The church is known for its historically significant interior, for example for the more than 100-square-meter mural The Last Judgement by Martin Schongauer.

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Carol Caraluzzi said 12 months ago
We will be in Breisach on river cruise Avalon on June 2nd. Can u tell me iwhat time the mass is. I have read it is 10:30am is this true Thank you


Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

bronwyn fabrie (13 months ago)
Worth visiting!
Marion Tron (14 months ago)
Impressive and massive cathedral on a hill with fine views
Stephan Handloser (14 months ago)
Sehr schönes Münster, man kann dort sehr gut entspannen. Und die Stimmung genießen. Ich fand es dort, sehr sehr schön. Immer wieder gerne :-)
Andreas (14 months ago)
Wahrzeichen der Stadt Breisach und schon vom weitem sichtbar. Ein Aufstieg der sich lohnt. Dolle Aussicht über den Rhein, die Stadt und den umliegenden Erhebungen, wie Kaiserstuhl, Vogesen und Schwarzwald. Auch das innere im Münster ist sehenswert. Sehr schöner Altar. Am besten die Stille auf sich wirken lassen.
Escobaria Gracilis (3 years ago)
Attractive old cathedral overlooking the old town and the Rhine valley/
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