The Breisacher Stephansmünster is a Romanesque-Gothic church and landmark of the town of Breisach am Rhein. The church dates from the 12th century and was expanded and remodelled to the Gothic style in the 15th century. The construction time is not precisely known. It was probably started after 1185 and completed in 1230. The church is known for its historically significant interior, for example for the more than 100-square-meter mural The Last Judgement by Martin Schongauer.

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Carol Caraluzzi said 3 years ago
We will be in Breisach on river cruise Avalon on June 2nd. Can u tell me iwhat time the mass is. I have read it is 10:30am is this true Thank you


Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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User Reviews

Pat L (2 years ago)
It’s a little bit of a walk up the cobblestone street to the church, if you stop along the way for pics and views it’s an easy walk. Like the sculpture in front of the church. Use the public bathroom before heading back down.
Bill Barlow (3 years ago)
Such a cool church with amazing history. I loved looking at the beautiful things inside.
Brenda (3 years ago)
The church stands as an old sentinel watching over the town high on a hill. A very picturesque and quaint little town along the Rhine river.
Dutch Debae (3 years ago)
It is a bit of a climb along cobblestone streets and sidewalks. But when you het to the top, the aerial views of the the city from around the church is magnificent!! Across from the church is the rathaus, the city hall .. and a sculpture. Public restroom is just across the square.
Jim Swaringen (3 years ago)
Although it was heavily damaged in WWII, it was rebuilt and today stands as a marker to be viewed from anywhere in the region. Breisach is rich in history and a lovely place to explore. We are making plans to return to enjoy the town and visit The Black Forest.
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