Clach an Trushal is the tallest standing stone (Menhir) in Scotland at 5,8 metres tall. Like many standing stones, it has been said that it marks the site of a great battle, the last one fought between the feuding clans of the Macaulays and Morrisons - however it is actually the solitary upright stone remaining from a stone circle built about 5,000 years ago. It occupied a place within the circle, although its placement was not central. The second last standing stone was removed in 1914, and used as a lintel.

From the base the stone circle at Steinacleit is clearly visible to the north east. The Callanish standing stones are 20 miles to the south west.

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Founded: 3000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Andy Slater (5 years ago)
Cristina Pipi (5 years ago)
Es una piedra impresionante, me gustó mucho
Alex Pacowta (5 years ago)
That stone was quite erect
Andrew Macpherson (6 years ago)
One of the tallest standing stones in Europe, said to be the tallest. As a place to visit the really nice thing is the complete lack of commercial exploitation
francesca francioni (6 years ago)
Tallest standing stone in scotland. Easy to miss. Go down the road and check left hand side. Worth it!
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