Amhuinnsuidhe Castle is a large private country house on the Isle of Harris, one of the Western Isles of Scotland. The house was built in 1865 for the 7th Earl of Dunmore, the then owner of the island. Amhuinnsuidhe was designed in the Scottish baronial style by architect David Bryce. In 2003 Amhuinnsuidhe Castle Estate purchased the castle and the fishing rights. The castle is now operated as a venue for shooting parties and other events.

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Founded: 1865
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ray Towey (3 years ago)
Fabulous castle great views just need good weather to make the most of the surrounding area. However if the weather isn't up to much you still won't be disappointed. Restaurant has a good menu and the staff are friendly and helpful. Rooms are clean and well kept. Give it a go and you won't be disappointed....
Alistair Duncan (3 years ago)
Our splurge stay of the trip. More a hunting lodge than a castle. Enjoyable all guests dining as a group. Food very good, but disappointing it was chicken the night we stayed, choice of one of two would have been better.
Kevin Whitworth (3 years ago)
Had an excellent tour round by the staff on our trip there with Catch 23.
Magnolia Ace (3 years ago)
Although I didn't go inside the castle from the outside it is well preserved. The castle grounds are immaculate and there is a large waterfall to the right of the castle. There is an honesty shop just along from the castle on the right hand side that sells the castles own smoked salmon and other delights. If visiting the castle I would recommend a visit to Huisinis beach further along the road. One of the most beautiful beaches on Harris.
Banner Hampton (3 years ago)
Take the scenic road to Huishinish on the Isle of Harris, encountering, steep hills, hidden lochs, waterfalls, remote villages, golden eagles and deer. Pass through the white gates to find Amhuinnsuidhe Castle, a spectacular hideaway offering outstanding accommodation, unsurpassed fishing and field sports, good food and Hebridean hospitality. Offers Exclusive Use, or individual rooms for guests who want to make use of our sporting facilities or for guests who want to come and relax in comfortable surroundings amidst a breathtaking wilderness. The focus is on providing a unique and unforgettable experience.
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Château de Falaise is best known as a castle, where William the Conqueror, the son of Duke Robert of Normandy, was born in about 1028. William went on to conquer England and become king and possession of the castle descended through his heirs until the 13th century when it was captured by King Philip II of France. Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840 it has been protected as a monument historique.

The castle (12th–13th century), which overlooks the town from a high crag, was formerly the seat of the Dukes of Normandy. The construction was started on the site of an earlier castle in 1123 by Henry I of England, with the 'large keep' (grand donjon). Later was added the 'small keep' (petit donjon). The tower built in the first quarter of the 12th century contained a hall, chapel, and a room for the lord, but no small rooms for a complicated household arrangement; in this way, it was similar to towers at Corfe, Norwich, and Portchester, all in England. In 1202 Arthur I, Duke of Brittany was King John of England's nephew, was imprisoned in Falaise castle's keep. According to contemporaneous chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall, John ordered two of his servants to mutilate the duke. Hugh de Burgh was in charge of guarding Arthur and refused to let him be mutilated, but to demoralise Arthur's supporters was to announce his death. The circumstances of Arthur's death are unclear, though he probably died in 1203.

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A programme of restoration was carried out between 1870 and 1874. The castle suffered due to bombardment during the Second World War in the battle for the Falaise pocket in 1944, but the three keeps were unscathed.