Pobull Fhìnn is a stone circle on the Isle of North Uist. The name is Gaelic which can be translated as 'Fionn's people,', 'the white/fair people', or 'Finn's tent'. The stones were probably named after the legendary Gaelic hero Fionn mac Cumhaill.

Of the several stone circles on the island, Pobull Fhìnn is the most conspicuous. It is located on the south side of Ben Langass, and it possibly dates from the second millennium BC. It is technically an oval rather than a circle, measuring about 120 feet from east to west and 93 feet from north to south. Although situated on a natural plateau, the north side of the enclosed area has been excavated to about four feet. At least two dozen stones can be counted, some eight on the northern half and 16 on the southern half, but parts of the circle are devoid of stones. About four feet within the circle at the east side is a tall single stone, and there are two fallen slabs about seven feet beyond the western edge.

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Founded: 3000-2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steven Kelty (13 months ago)
Great place for a walk with superb views.
Mark On The Move (2 years ago)
Overgrown with braken but beautiful surroundings
Adam Richardson (2 years ago)
Decent side circle, but a bit buried amongst the bracken. Good as part of a circular walk, taking in Barpa Langass and great views at the top of the hill. But not much to see by itself.
Mike Newsome (2 years ago)
A nice walk to the stones via a well marked path, however the hotel doesnt seem to embrace visitors to the stones there are many signs stating hotel patrons parking only so park further down the track, stones them selves are a little over grown with heather but offer a great views
Duncan McDougall (2 years ago)
Nice stone circle with easy trail to reach it. No gift shop, no interactive exhibition, no buses of tourists; just solitide and nature so pretty much perfect.
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