Kames Castle is a castellated mansion house on the Isle of Bute. On the shore of Kames Bay near Port Bannatyne, the castle consists of a 14th-century tower, with a house built on it in the 18th Century. The Castle is set in 20 acres (81,000 m2) of planted grounds, including a two-acre 18th century walled garden. Originally the seat of the Bannatyne family, Kames is one of the oldest continuously inhabited houses in Scotland.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Caroline Stott (17 months ago)
We stayed in the lodge just inside the gates with a stunning view of the sea. The lodge was immaculately decorated and was clean and most importantly warm. There's eveything you need at the lodge. There's a lovely kitchen with an oven and a microwave. The views are amazing.
Jamieson (2 years ago)
Nice holiday cottage needs some small improvements, to shower especially, but was a good base for our holiday
Fred McCluskey (2 years ago)
Kames Castle estate has a lovely rustic charm with a walled garden and splendid views all round. 5 holiday cottages refurbished to a high standard in 2018. The castle tower and other cottages are currently being refurbished. Something for all the family here .
Bob Le Cornu (3 years ago)
Had the lodge for a week, nice and peaceful. Very comfortable and quaint.
Chris Parker (3 years ago)
Brilliant
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