Krzyztopór Castle

Ujazd, Poland

It is unknown when the construction of Krzyżtopór impressive fortress began. The first documented proof of the construction of the castle comes from 1627, when it was uncompleted. It was probably finished it in 1644, having spent the enormous sum of 30 million Polish zlotys on the work. The castle was inherited by Ossoliński's son Krzysztof Baldwin Ossoliński, who died in 1649 in the Battle of Zborów. After his death, the formidable complex was purchased by the family of the Denhoffs, then by the Kalinowskis.

In 1655, during the Swedish invasion of Poland, the castle was captured by the Swedes, who occupied it until 1657, pillaging the entire complex. The damage to the structure was so extensive that after the Swedes’ withdrawal it was not rebuilt, as it was deemed too costly. Several noble families (the Morsztyns, the Wiśniowieckis and the Pacs) lived in the best preserved, western wing, but the castle otherwise remained in ruins.

In 1770, during the Bar Confederation, Krzyżtopór, defended by the Confederate units, was seized by the Russians, who completed the building's ruin. Reportedly, last known inhabitant of the complex, Stanisław Sołtyk, lived there in the years 1782–87, after which time Krzyżtopór has been abandoned.

During the Second World War the complex was again ransacked. A partial remodeling took place in 1971, and in 1980 the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs decided to rebuild it for use as a rest area for officers. This work was halted in 1981, when martial law was imposed in Poland.

Today the castle, without convenient proximity to main roads and rail connections, is visited by relatively few tourists. However, as walls, bastions and moat are relatively well-preserved, its magnitude is still very impressive. Though it is regarded as a permanent ruin, since around 90 percent of the walls have been preserved, reconstruction has been planned several times. Currently, efforts have been underway to roof the entire complex; however, this ambitious project lacks sufficient funding.

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Address

D758, Ujazd, Poland
See all sites in Ujazd

Details

Founded: 1627
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rodrigo Meneses (9 months ago)
really impressive. a great work of architecture. spectacular design. interesting to walk inside and feel the history that surrounds this project that is already a local history of this town. its a must visit for learn more about this
Kimba Frances Kerner (12 months ago)
I think the Swedes aught to fix it for Poland, since they still have Poland’s Crown Jewels. ?Everyone should come see this place, because it’s so beautiful and the scale is astounding.
Piotr Siejczuk (13 months ago)
Awesome place where you can spend quite some time, walking around, discovering interesting climate of this Castle. Perfect place to take some lovely photos and portraits shoots! Highly recommend!
Sorin-Alexandru Sandu (14 months ago)
Lovely place to visit. The adult ticket is 12 PLN (~£3) There is no guide but there are signs to guide you around (only in Polish), and by my visit, the vast majority of the castle was open, which was pretty cool. Outside are little shops, souvenirs and ice-cream spots. To get here, I have driven, and the roads around are countryside roads.
Michał Górski (16 months ago)
Really amazing monument. It is really worth to visit the castle inside but also to walk around outside the walls. Your will find the river source behind the castle
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