Krzyztopór Castle

Ujazd, Poland

It is unknown when the construction of Krzyżtopór impressive fortress began. The first documented proof of the construction of the castle comes from 1627, when it was uncompleted. It was probably finished it in 1644, having spent the enormous sum of 30 million Polish zÅ‚otys on the work. The castle was inherited by OssoliÅ„ski's son Krzysztof Baldwin OssoliÅ„ski, who died in 1649 in the Battle of Zborów. After his death, the formidable complex was purchased by the family of the Denhoffs, then by the Kalinowskis.

In 1655, during the Swedish invasion of Poland, the castle was captured by the Swedes, who occupied it until 1657, pillaging the entire complex. The damage to the structure was so extensive that after the Swedes’ withdrawal it was not rebuilt, as it was deemed too costly. Several noble families (the Morsztyns, the WiÅ›niowieckis and the Pacs) lived in the best preserved, western wing, but the castle otherwise remained in ruins.

In 1770, during the Bar Confederation, Krzyżtopór, defended by the Confederate units, was seized by the Russians, who completed the building's ruin. Reportedly, last known inhabitant of the complex, StanisÅ‚aw SoÅ‚tyk, lived there in the years 1782–87, after which time Krzyżtopór has been abandoned.

During the Second World War the complex was again ransacked. A partial remodeling took place in 1971, and in 1980 the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs decided to rebuild it for use as a rest area for officers. This work was halted in 1981, when martial law was imposed in Poland.

Today the castle, without convenient proximity to main roads and rail connections, is visited by relatively few tourists. However, as walls, bastions and moat are relatively well-preserved, its magnitude is still very impressive. Though it is regarded as a permanent ruin, since around 90 percent of the walls have been preserved, reconstruction has been planned several times. Currently, efforts have been underway to roof the entire complex; however, this ambitious project lacks sufficient funding.

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Address

D758, Ujazd, Poland
See all sites in Ujazd

Details

Founded: 1627
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

piotr mich-al (12 months ago)
Beautiful pice of history. Recommend
Anna Bell (2 years ago)
It was the biggest resistance in Europe but was short lived. Impressive to visit. I recommend it.
Dan DuVal (2 years ago)
Hillariously located in the middle of small town, the castle itself has no interiors, but the Italian style and the size are impressive. Restrooms, gift shops and not much more, but worth seeing
Pan (2 years ago)
very impressive ruins of the Krzystopor castle, great opportunity for photos
Sebastian Tryczyk (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle with many underground corridors to explore. Highly recommended specially when going with kids.
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