Elchingen Abbey Church

Oberelchingen, Germany

Elchingen Abbey was a Benedictine monastery in Oberelchingen. For much of its history, Elchingen was one of the 40-odd self-ruling imperial abbeys of the Holy Roman Empire and, as such, was a virtually independent state that contained several villages aside from the monastery itself. At the time of its secularisation in 1802, the abbey covered 112 square kilometers and had 4000-4200 subjects.

Dedicated to the Virgin Mary and Saints Peter and Paul, the monastery was founded by the Counts of Dillingen in 1128. The abbey was one of the very few that enjoyed Imperial immediacy (independent of the jurisdiction of any lord and answering directly to the Holy Roman Emperor, and thus a territorial principality in its own right). The abbot sat in the Reichstag of the Holy Roman Empire.

Like all the other imperial abbeys, Elchingen lost its independence in the course of the secularisation process in 1802-1803 and the monastery was dissolved. By 1840 the buildings had been almost entirely demolished. In 1921 the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate settled on the site. Today the abbey church remains.

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Details

Founded: 1128
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

K. Mayer (20 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne Klosterkirche, es lohnt sich diese anzusehen. Ein herrlicher Blick bei klarem Wetter bis zu den Alpen
Denise Tebbutt (2 years ago)
It's a very beautiful and interesting place. The church is amazing. The views are outstanding and it is seeped in history about Napoleon Bonaparte.
Goran Stojkovski (2 years ago)
Extraordinary religious and historic location. Dedicated to the Virgin Mary and Saints Peterand Paul, the monastery was founded by the Counts of Dillingen. The abbey was one of the very few that enjoyed Imperial immediacy(independent of the jurisdiction of any lord and answering directly to the Holy Roman Emperor, and thus a territorial principality in its own right). The abbot sat in the Reichstagof the Holy Roman Empire. The Battle of Elchingen, fought on 14 October 1805, saw French forces under Michel Neyrout an Austrian corps led by Johann Sigismund Riesch. This defeat led to a large part of the Austrian army being invested in the fortress of Ulm by the army of Emperor Napoleon I of France while other formations fled to the east. Soon afterward, the Austrians trapped in Ulm surrendered and the French mopped up most of the remaining Austrians forces, bringing the Ulm Campaign to a close.
J S (2 years ago)
A must see cathedral. The grounds are kept extraordinarily well and has scenic views.
Maria Emília Montez Rath (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with a nice nativity scene. You pay a very small fee for some lights to turn on and hear some music.
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