Ruhnu Lighthouse

Ruhnu, Estonia

Ruhnu lighthouse is one of the few quadrupod lighthouses (having four supporting legs). It is said to have been designed by Gustave Eiffel and according to the plaque on the lighthouse door it was made in 1875 in Le Havre, in Normandy, France, by the company Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée.

Reference: 7is7.com

Comments

Your name



Address

Ruhnu, Estonia
See all sites in Ruhnu

Details

Founded: 1875
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

Interesting Sites Nearby

User Reviews

Marek Jupits (4 years ago)
Kena koht
Õie Pärn (4 years ago)
Kaunis ja hubane paik puhkamiseks,soovitan rahu ja vaikust hindavatele inimestele.Tore ja sõbralik pererahvas.
Sandra Erinovska (4 years ago)
Brīnišķīgi. Eifeļa torņa jaunākais brālis
Silver Pik (5 years ago)
Terve päeva ratastega või jalgsi risti-rästi saar läbi käidud - just siis on hea päeva lõpus minna ka Ruhnu Tuletorni ning vaadata üle kõik need kohad, mida päeva jooksul külastatud. Tuletornist on lihtsalt kogu saar su ees. Väga huvitava disainiga ning ajalooga metallist tuletorn - teist sellist siinkandis ei leia.
Ilja Antonovits (5 years ago)
Very old ligthouse, but should be visited.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.