Ruhnu Lighthouse

Ruhnu, Estonia

Ruhnu lighthouse is one of the few quadrupod lighthouses (having four supporting legs). It is said to have been designed by Gustave Eiffel and according to the plaque on the lighthouse door it was made in 1875 in Le Havre, in Normandy, France, by the company Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée.

Reference: 7is7.com

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Ruhnu, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1875
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

Interesting Sites Nearby

User Reviews

Marek Jupits (2 years ago)
Kena koht
Õie Pärn (2 years ago)
Kaunis ja hubane paik puhkamiseks,soovitan rahu ja vaikust hindavatele inimestele.Tore ja sõbralik pererahvas.
Sandra Erinovska (2 years ago)
Brīnišķīgi. Eifeļa torņa jaunākais brālis
Silver Pik (3 years ago)
Terve päeva ratastega või jalgsi risti-rästi saar läbi käidud - just siis on hea päeva lõpus minna ka Ruhnu Tuletorni ning vaadata üle kõik need kohad, mida päeva jooksul külastatud. Tuletornist on lihtsalt kogu saar su ees. Väga huvitava disainiga ning ajalooga metallist tuletorn - teist sellist siinkandis ei leia.
Ilja Antonovits (3 years ago)
Very old ligthouse, but should be visited.
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