Plassenburg Castle

Kulmbach, Germany

Plassenburg is one of the most impressive castles in Germany and a symbol of the Kulmbach. It was first mentioned in 1135. The Plassenberg family were ministerial of the counts of Andechs (later the dukes of Andechs-Meranien) and used as their seat the Plassenburg. The House of Guttenberg, a prominent Franconian noble family, traces its origins back to 1149 with a Gundeloh v. Plassenberg. The name Guttenberg is derived from Guttenberg and was adopted by a Heinrich von Blassenberg around 1310. From 1340, the Hohenzollerns governed from Plassenburg castle their territories in Franconia till 1604. The Plassenburg was fortress and residence for the Hohenzollerns.

The castle was destroyed in 1554 at the end of the second Margravian war (1552–1554) of margrave Albert Alcibiades. The Plassenburg was later rebuilt by the architect Caspar Vischer as an impressive stronghold and as a huge palace. In 1792, Margrave Alexander sold the Plassenburg to his cousin, the King of Prussia. A combined Bavarian and French army under the command of Jérôme Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon, besieged the Plassenburg in 1806. In 1810, Kulmbach became Bavarian and the castle was used as a prison and as a military hospital. During the second world war, the Organisation Todt used the Plassenburg as a training camp and recreation home. Today, it is a museum and a venue for cultural events.

It contains a significant collection of Prussian military artifacts and portraits.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas P (2 years ago)
Was unable to go inside but a fascinating place to walk around and look at without much legwork. You can drive up into the arcade, but unsure the parking situation on weekdays.
Nizar Alhaj (3 years ago)
Cool nice View
Malvin Bernard (3 years ago)
Nice views from this hill top. Also inside the fort is worth visiting. A small restaurant or café would be great though.
Kevin Ong (3 years ago)
Quite an easy hike. View is great and once up there is rather gratifying. Trip down is a tad bit steep but nothing daunting.
Holger Rothemund (3 years ago)
Great castle with nice museums. You can have a great view of the old part of Kulmbach. Definitely worth a visit when you are around.
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