Plassenburg Castle

Kulmbach, Germany

Plassenburg is one of the most impressive castles in Germany and a symbol of the Kulmbach. It was first mentioned in 1135. The Plassenberg family were ministerial of the counts of Andechs (later the dukes of Andechs-Meranien) and used as their seat the Plassenburg. The House of Guttenberg, a prominent Franconian noble family, traces its origins back to 1149 with a Gundeloh v. Plassenberg. The name Guttenberg is derived from Guttenberg and was adopted by a Heinrich von Blassenberg around 1310. From 1340, the Hohenzollerns governed from Plassenburg castle their territories in Franconia till 1604. The Plassenburg was fortress and residence for the Hohenzollerns.

The castle was destroyed in 1554 at the end of the second Margravian war (1552–1554) of margrave Albert Alcibiades. The Plassenburg was later rebuilt by the architect Caspar Vischer as an impressive stronghold and as a huge palace. In 1792, Margrave Alexander sold the Plassenburg to his cousin, the King of Prussia. A combined Bavarian and French army under the command of Jérôme Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon, besieged the Plassenburg in 1806. In 1810, Kulmbach became Bavarian and the castle was used as a prison and as a military hospital. During the second world war, the Organisation Todt used the Plassenburg as a training camp and recreation home. Today, it is a museum and a venue for cultural events.

It contains a significant collection of Prussian military artifacts and portraits.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sibylle Turner (13 months ago)
Only worth visiting if you want the view over Kulmbach. We have seen better. There is no parking at the castle. Roads are either one-way or lead nowhere if you follow Google Maps. Signage in town insufficient. You can do a self-guided tour to the first floor army museum and can see one room with an ancient bed plus the church. It cost about €4.50. A guided tour includes another floor. The walk on foot to the castle is 22° incline, very steep. Recommend to skip castle. There are better ones.
Lou Fegans (14 months ago)
Parking: free parking in the castle itself and along the right hand side of the turnaround. Attraction: worth a walk around the outside of the castle (20min) the museums inside are unimpressive. Cute town worth visiting but castle can be skipped
Astor Voltaires (17 months ago)
Really beautiful place. You can enter for free. The best was the view from the city. Recommended
Dermot (2 years ago)
Lovely castle, great views. Unfortunately tours in German only. .
Petkol (2 years ago)
Nice place. Interesting museum. Beautiful view
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror (Topographie des Terrors) is an outdoor and indoor history museum. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era.

The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished.