Ehrenburg Palace

Coburg, Germany

Ehrenburg Palace was built by Johann Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Coburg, in 1543-47. It replaced the Veste Coburg as the Dukes' city Residenz. The new city palace was built around a dissolved Franciscan monastery.

According to tradition, the palace was named Ehrenburg ('Palace of Honour') by Emperor Charles V for having been constructed without the use of forced labour.

In 1690, a fire destroyed the northern part of the palace. This was an opportunity for Albert V, Duke of Saxe-Coburg, who had a new Baroque style palace built in 1699.

In the 19th century, Ernst I had the palace redesigned by Karl Friedrich Schinkel in Gothic Revival style, beginning in 1810. Between 1816 and 1840 the state apartments were redesigned in the French Empire style.

The palace is used as a museum today. Among other exhibits, it features art galleries with works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, Dutch and Flemish artists of the 16th and 17th centuries as well as romantic landscape paintings.

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Address

Steingasse 22, Coburg, Germany
See all sites in Coburg

Details

Founded: 1543
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jpridge1280 (8 months ago)
All the way from Munich just to see the Palace Ehrenburg to find out they closed it for the day to do some repairs. They could of done their repairs on Monday when the palace is closed to the public. No mention or notice on the webpage when when I booked my trip a few days prior or else I would not of gone. I spoke to the lady at the reception on the first floor in the library who also had no clue till I showed her the photo. She was kind to let me wander about the library. I will be writing a complaint to their office, but I doubt they would care. Beautiful exterior I must say. Just a shame!!!!
Jim Becker (17 months ago)
Well done town castle
Michael Miller (2 years ago)
Absolutely gorgeous . . . but I can't quite give the experience 5 stars because of two reasons: #1 no pictures are allowed inside. #2 the tour guide was not very animated and it even though he had lots of facts, it came across as if he read a script. But the rooms really are beautiful and the price is reasonable.
Nikolai Robertsen (2 years ago)
Lovely place with lovely people. That chap Ernst II sure knows how to treat guests!
Kristina Miller (3 years ago)
I took one of the guided tours that run every hour and absolutely loved the place! Our tour guide was very professional and humorous. I totally recommend this place to everybody, but the language of a tour was German. Not sure if they do an English version.
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