Ehrenburg Palace

Coburg, Germany

Ehrenburg Palace was built by Johann Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Coburg, in 1543-47. It replaced the Veste Coburg as the Dukes' city Residenz. The new city palace was built around a dissolved Franciscan monastery.

According to tradition, the palace was named Ehrenburg ('Palace of Honour') by Emperor Charles V for having been constructed without the use of forced labour.

In 1690, a fire destroyed the northern part of the palace. This was an opportunity for Albert V, Duke of Saxe-Coburg, who had a new Baroque style palace built in 1699.

In the 19th century, Ernst I had the palace redesigned by Karl Friedrich Schinkel in Gothic Revival style, beginning in 1810. Between 1816 and 1840 the state apartments were redesigned in the French Empire style.

The palace is used as a museum today. Among other exhibits, it features art galleries with works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, Dutch and Flemish artists of the 16th and 17th centuries as well as romantic landscape paintings.

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Address

Steingasse 22, Coburg, Germany
See all sites in Coburg

Details

Founded: 1543
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mikli Pergjegji (2 years ago)
Ehrenburg Palace Schloss Ehrenburg
AL Xiordia (2 years ago)
Beautiful and interesting for those who like history a lot. The tour is only with a guide, they show you many rooms, but you cannot take photos inside. Still, I highly recommend it if you want to learn a little more about the Saxony Coburg and Gotha family.
Dimitri Sergeynov (2 years ago)
Great architecture
Norman Rohr (3 years ago)
Nice palace at the city center.
Irina Shalamanova (3 years ago)
The most amazing castle!!! Totally worth a visit. Note that you can enter only in round hour with a guided tour. And the tour is only in German.
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