Neunussberg Castle

Viechtach, Germany

The lords of Nußberg are known since the first half of the 12th century. The Neunußberg castle was built by Konrad von Nußberg in 1340-1350. It was destroyed by lightning in 1564 and left to decay without military purpose. Today Medieval castle tower, relics of the rampart with tower and the chapel (1353) remain.

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Details

Founded: 1340-1350
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mani H. (3 months ago)
Very nice vantage point, from here you can see the nearby tower of "Altnussberg" which is also worth a visit.
Joyce YU (4 months ago)
It was first built more 600 years ago and now hosts the castle festival.
Ralf Tschauner (4 months ago)
From the castle tower you have a great view of the surroundings. You can climb the tower even in the evening and admire the sunset. A donation of 1 euro per person is welcome.
Simone Weinzierl (4 months ago)
The Schlossberghaus below the castle is ideal for larger groups. 28 beds. Two kitchens. A barbecue area. And lots of green for the children to play with. The castle itself is freely accessible. You have a great view.
Aaron White (21 months ago)
Really nice view. Just remember to give them a 1€
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