The East Bohemian town of Litomyšl emerged in the 13th century on the site of an older fortified settlement on the Trstenice path - an important trading route linking Bohemia and Moravia.

The dominant feature of Litomysl is the monumental Renaissance castle dating from the years 1568 - 1581. The buildings of the castle precincts are not only exceptional for their architectural refinement, but have also inscribed themselves in history as the birthplace of the Czech national composer, Bedrich Smetana. On the elongated square, which is one of the largest in the Czech Republic, stands a town hall of Gothic origin and a series of Renaissance and baroque houses, many with arcades and vaulted groundfloor rooms. One of the most important of these is the House At the Knights with its remarkable facade. In the past the town was also a significant religious centre; it was in Litomysl in 1344 that the second bishopric to be established in Bohemia was founded.

The cultural traditions of the town go much beyond regional and national frontiers. The exquisite interiors of the castle, especially the baroque castle theatre, the amphitheatre in the castle park and Smetanas house, all offer varied programmes of concerts and theatrical performances and thus emrich the life of the town throughout the year. The chateau complex was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1999.

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Founded: 1568-1581
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George Skylark (20 months ago)
Absolute gem. Perfect for weekend if you want to explore it's history. Great prices for hotel and food.
Fazal Ballim (2 years ago)
Great historical site. Worth a visit
Vladimír Karásek (2 years ago)
Best place on earth
Dennis Hetteling (2 years ago)
Luckily there were like 0 people when i was there. It can be a lot more crowded than my pics show. I can fully recommend
Robin Joseph (2 years ago)
Great place to visit if you pass by the town. It was in summer that I visited as such it was hot. Will be cool to visit during other seasons.
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