Jouarre Abbey was traditionally founded around 630 AD by the Abbess Theodochilde or Telchilde. She was inspired by the visit of St. Columban, the travelling Irish monk who inspired monastic institution-building in the early seventh century. As part of its Celtic heritage, Jouarre was established as a double community of monks as well as nuns, both under the rule of the abbess, who in 1225 was granted immunity from interference by the bishop of Meaux, answering only to the pope.

The Merovingian (pre-Romanesque) crypt beneath the Romanesque abbey church contains a number of burials in sarcophagi, notably that of Theodochilde's brother, Agilbert (died 680), carved with a tableau of the Last Judgment and Christ in Majesty, highlights of pre-Romanesque sculpture. In the mid-ninth century the abbey acquired relics of St. Potentian; the relics assembled at Jouarre attracted pilgrims. The reputation of the house stood so high the abbey received a visit from Pope Innocent II in 1131 and was able to house a synod in 1133. The abbess's submission to the bishop of Meaux did not come about until Bossuet held the post in 1690.

The abbey is an important pilgrimage center. A fortified town was built around it and gave birth to the present city of Jouarre.

At the time of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre (1572), the abbess Charlotte of Bourbon (1547–1582) converted to Protestantism and escaped from the abbey in a cart of hay, and fled to Germany. She married William I of Orange-Nassau.

The present monastery buildings, once again occupied by Benedictine nuns, date from the eighteenth century; their traditional vegetable and fruit garden are notable.

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Details

Founded: 630 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valérie Benmeziane (19 months ago)
Bel endroit à visiter. Patrimoine seine-et-marnais à découvrir. Allez à la boutique où sont vendus d'excellents produits régionaux et artisanaux
Laurent Magnin (19 months ago)
Un havre de paix.
Jeffrey Clarus (20 months ago)
Le déjeuner en silence c'est une expérience à vivre ! Je le suis vraiment senti bien dans ce lieu, l'atmosphère paisible invite au recueillement.
Thib aut (20 months ago)
Toujours un plaisir de venir prier et faire un tour à la boutiuqe où de très bons produits sont vendus. Les vendeuses sont chaleureuses et souriantes. Lieu à recommander.
ib3009 (2 years ago)
Très bonne entente avec les bonnes sœurs. Mais ce n'est pas tellement pour les enfants car les sentons casses facilement
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