Buchlovice castle history is closely connected with nearby Buchlov Castle which grew more and more uncomfortable in the late 17th century, and that is why Jan Dětřich of Petřwald decided to build a new castle. Buchlovice castle was built between 1707-1738 as a copy of an Italian villa in baroque style, by Domenico Martinelli. It is one of the most romantic buildings in this country. In 1800 it became property of the Berchtolds, and since 1945 the state castle is open to the public.

The château complex is made up the ceremonial building known as the Dolní zámek (Lower Château), and the building known as Horní zámek (Upper Château), which had a service function. A courtyard of honour extends between the two. Around the château an Italian-style park was created, which was extended and altered in the English style in the first half of the 19th century and is among the most valuable of its kind in the Czech Republic. After the Petřvald dynasty died out the château was acquired in 1800 by the Berchtolds. In 1807 Leopold I Berchtold established a military hospital in part of the château and a drapery in the stables. The château is open to the public and visitors can admire the state rooms, and chambers with rich stucco work and painted ceilings.

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Founded: 1707-1738
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr Litera (2 months ago)
The chateau was a pleasant surprise, a great closure of the season 2021. The guide was of the best sort, probably a best guide of this season. The sad end of the last owners was worth reminding.
Radek Chlada (6 months ago)
Super place interesting beautifull garden.
Radek Salomon (6 months ago)
The Chateau is nice but in the garden around are amazing trees...
Miklós Gréczi (8 months ago)
Beautiful castle in Czech Republic with nice big park with old trees.
Liam Guy Hiram Proven (2 years ago)
Beautiful gardens, wonderful chocolatier.
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