The Buchlov royal castle was built in the first half of the 13th century, but archaeological finds suggest that the area around Buchlov castle was settled in the oldest periods of civilization.

The first castle was created with two massive prismatic towers situated on opposite parts of a rocky plateau. A high palace on the southern part of the yard was built at the same time and it was surrounded by a wall. The second construction period occurred in the 1370s. Another tower was built and on the second floor of this tower there was a chapel that held the most valuable objects of early Gothic architecture of the day.

The chapel was destroyed and then abandoned when Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus captured the castle in the second half of the 15th century. It was replaced by two large rooms serving as store and depository. And although the castle was a permanent possession of a king until the 16th century, it was often given in pawn to aristocratic clans. Nobles of Cimburk owned it at the end of the 15th century. At that time a representative chivalric hall was built. In the year 1511 the castle was given to a private holder, and from the 16th to 18th century various Moravian clans changed its ownership. The most important were the nobles of Žerotín, Zástřizl and Petřvald families. Constructional work continued in Renaissance style. Some parts of the castle were added in baroque style. However, in 1701, the Buchlovice Castle was finished and in 1751 the owners, the Berchtold noble family, occupied it for more than two centuries.

A family museum was built in the castle thanks to the brothers Leopold Berchtold and Bedřich Berchtold. Leopold Berchtold, who was foreign minister of Austria-Hungary at the beginning of World War I. He was buried at Buchlau after his death in November 1942. In 1945, after the end of World War II, the castle was confiscated on the bases of Beneš decrees and became property of the Czechoslovak state. Later it was added to the list of national cultural monuments. Nowadays it is open to public, and many cultural programs are held each year.

Saint Barbara’s Chapel also called Barborka came into existence in the 13th century, and it was used as a funeral crypt for holders of a manor of Buchlov. Later it was rebuilt and finished in the year 1672. It is built in early baroque style on a cruciform plan with a central cupola. It is one kilometer away from Buchlov castle. Pilgrimage divine services are held to this day.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexandra Junaskova (2 years ago)
Interesting castle where you can witness the architectural flow of time. Closed in winter. Stylish local pub. And horses around. Must see.
Lubomir L (2 years ago)
Beautiful place. If you're traveling around and have enough time, don't forget to stop by. Excellent side views, interesting geo caches, great restaurants. Nice people.
Ajka UK (3 years ago)
Come here sooner than 3pm if you want an excursion inside of the castle . Open till 4pm. Today most windy day. Not so good for walking. But we missed last entrance to the castle. The most beautiful seems to be castle Buchlovice about 14km from this one.
Marcus Fuchs (3 years ago)
Great tours. Have booklets that let you read along in each room. Brilliant history when you do the full tour. Well worth the entry fee. Even the food inside the castle is grest. Fresh homemade Czech food! Portions are for a Czech construction worker so might want to avoid the soup! Was happily stuffed!
Katka Nováková (3 years ago)
Interesting and bigger than you think. We didn’t take a tour since they were all in Czech but for basic admission you can look around quite a big area with the restaurant, the gift shop, the gallery. Next time we will try the tour.
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