Hrádek u Nechanic is a 19th-century Gothic style Romantic château near the town of Hrádek. It was built between 1839 and 1857 as a representative and summer seat by Count František Arnošt of Harach, one of the most important representatives of the Jilemnice dynasty. The young Austrian architect Karl Fischer led building operations and suggested decoration of the chateau's interior. The chateau was designed by the English architect Edward Buckton Lamb. Most of the furniture was made by local artisans. The remainder of the interior was brought from Italy and Austria. Around the same time, L. Krüger converted part of the local forest into a park. In the left part of the park, a reserve and pheasantry were founded. In 1945, the chateau was confiscated.

The chateau is a two-storey building with a prismatic tower, which includes battlements, a small shooting tower in the middle and two polygonal risalits on both sides. The chateau consists of two symmetrical wings. The west wing includes St. Ann´s chapel. On the east side are economic and administrative buildings, and a theatre. The park covers 30 hectares and includes meadows, and forests with deciduous and conifer trees. Some trees are of exotic origin.

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Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

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