Friedberg Castle

Friedberg, Germany

The Friedberg castle was subsequently built to serve as a border security and customs post for the Duchy of Bavaria and Swabia, but put the town in opposition to the free city of Augsburg. It was built between 1257-1264 by Duke Ludwig II.

The castle was the cause of the first burning of Friedberg by Augsburg in 1396. The town was subject to the many frequent wars between Swabia, Bavaria and Augsburg.

A revival in the town's fortunes came when, in 1568, the Duchess Christine chose Friedberg castle as her seat following her husband's death. The town became the centre of Bavarian court life, but was short lived when the town was ravaged by the plague in 1599. More suffering came as the town was sacked twice by the Swedes during the Thirty Years War. After the war only the town hall, castle and city walls were left standing.

The castle is situated on a spur of and has an unusually deep moat. Since the renovation in 1982, Friedberg castle has been a museum.

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Details

Founded: 1257
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.museum-friedberg.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henrik Ritz (4 years ago)
The museum is new and excellent. There are three main parts on the first floor : the town's local watchmakers, a prehistoric and roman age section and a section of the last few hundreds years. On the ground floor you can find the history and collections of local artists. Unfortunately taking photos is not allowed at all in the museum. The museum cafe has tasty cookies and cakes and coffee and other drinks also. Books in german and postcards available in the museum shops.
Valentine Gogichashvili (4 years ago)
Newly renovated castle with a perfectly organized museum dedicated to the city history, watches, and pottery.
Giorgio Syro (4 years ago)
Not much to see, just a rebuilded unimpressive "palace". The only worth watching is the museum with old hand made watches, if anyone has an interest to that kind of things.
Dave Laycock (4 years ago)
Nice, informative. The cafe has a small selection of cakes and drinks. There is an elevator.
Carmel Agius (Nenu) (4 years ago)
Amazing, state of the art museum, about the unique and intricate craftsmanship of watches in Friedberg from the 1800's. Most attractive is also the archeological display of the old history of this Bavarian town.
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