Basilica di San Marino

San Marino, San Marino

The Basilica di San Marino is dedicated to Saint Marinus, the founder and patron of the San Marino Republic. The present church was built in 1836 in place of an earlier one that dated to 7th century. It is built in the Neoclassical style, with a porch of eight Corinthian columns. Relics of St. Marino are enshrined in the basilica.

An earlier church was erected on the spot in the 4th century which was dedicated to the same patron. The first document attesting the existence of the church dates to 530 in the La Vita di San Severino by Eugippius. A later document, the Placito Feretrano, dates from 885. The first document that directly relates to the 'Pieve di San Marino' is dated 31 July 1113, with donations from the faithful public.

At the beginning of the 1800s, the church was in critical condition. In 1807, it was razed and a project for the construction of the new church was handed to the Bolognese Achille Serra. In 1825, the council decided to build a new church in the place where the old church had stood. Construction began in 1826 and was completed in 1838. On 5 February 1838, the church was solemnly inaugurated in the presence of the Bishop of Montefeltro, Crispino Agostinucci and the Captain's-Regent.

Over the course of centuries, the basilica has witnessed civil turmoil. Because of this, in 1992, the Vatican made several decrees. These included that the basilica, as the mother-church of all churches within the Republic, is made exempt from the jurisdiction of the parish of the city of San Marino. The basilica is entrusted to the care of a priest who holds the title of Rector, and the Rector is appointed and removed in accordance with canon law.

The interior of the basilica consists of three naves, supported by sixteen Corinthian columns which form a large ambulatory around the semicircular apse. The altar is adorned by a statue of St. Marino by Adamo Tadolini, a student of Antonio Canova. Under the altar are relics of St. Marino which were found on 3 March 1586; some relics were donated to the island of Rab (Croatia), the birthplace of the saint, on 28 January 1595. A reliquary bust in silver and gold dated to 2 September 1602 lies to the right of altar. In the right aisle is a small altar dedicated to Mary Magdelene and a painting by Elisabetta Sirani.

The Chiesa di San Pietro is located at the Basilica of San Marino, to the side of the front steps. It was originally built in 600. It houses a valuable altar with inlaid marble, donated by the musician Antonio Tedeschi in 1689, which is surmounted by a statue dedicated to St. Peter by Enrico Saroldi. In the crypt of this church there are two niches cut into rock that are said to be the beds of San Marino and San Leo. Inside is a monument to Pope John XXIII, erected by the Government of the Republic.

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Founded: 1826-1838
Category: Religious sites in San Marino

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Asiyah Noemi Koso (4 months ago)
Arriving at the small square before reaching the first tower, we were immediately captivated by the beautiful Basilica of St. Marino. The Basilica of San Marino is the main church of the City of San Marino, belonging to the diocese of San Marino-Montefeltro, is dedicated to the patron saint of the city and the state. It is located in Piazzale Domus Plebis. In the place where today the basilica rises, already in the 4th century there was a church dedicated to San Marino deacon. The interior of the Basilica is simply decorated, but in its simplicity is beautiful. The main altar is decorated with the statue of San Marino deacon by Tadolini, a pupil of Canova. Under the altar are part of the relics of the saint that were found on 3 March 1586. Beautiful Basilika is definitely worth a visit.
Kiran Kizhakkekkut (4 months ago)
You must check the time of opening..when I was there by 4pm it was closed..
Mariana Przysiny (11 months ago)
The Basilica di San Marino (Marino translates from Latin to "man of the sea")[1] is a Catholic church located in the Republic of San Marino. While the country has a distinct domination of historic religious buildings of Christian faith, the basilica is the main church of the City of San Marino. It is situated on Piazza Domus Plebis in the northeastern edge of the city, adjacent to the Church of St. Peter. It is dedicated to Saint Marinus, the founder and patron of the Republic.
Mo Iggy Loh (11 months ago)
This is a simple church built in the neoclassical style. It is dedicated to St. Marinus, the founder of the Republic of San Marino. His relics are enshrined under the main altar. It is also the Co-Cathedral of the Diocese of San Marino-Montefeltro. Entrance is free, but there is nothing truly spectacular here if you will like to compare to the basilicas across Italy. Worth attention to will be the relics of the Saint and the Throne of the Captains-Regent.
Faulkner Priestman (2 years ago)
Everything was PERFECT for the wedding photography at San Marino Presbyterian Church..!!! Architectural and Environmental settings were absolutely BEAUTIFUL for photography. I found many good photo spots for B&G, Group and Family portraits. This church became one of my favorite wedding ceremonial sites. The Bride's waiting room was pretty. The courtyard offers beautiful landscape for portrait sessions of Bride & Groom together. Please look at my photos for more details..!!
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