Chiesa di San Francesco

San Marino, San Marino

Chiesa di San Francesco construction was begun in 1351 and completed around 1400. The rose window was covered in the 17th century it was brought to light last renovation performed by Gino Zani and brought back largely to the original lines. In the cloister is the tomb of Bishop Marino Madroni, who lived in the 15th century.

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Founded: 1351
Category: Religious sites in San Marino

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Glenn Colley (3 years ago)
Interesting that the temple was turned into a catholic place of baptism. Faunt now has money in it.
Horace Cimafranca (3 years ago)
Quaint community church just outside San Marino's centro storico.
Mark Gibbs (3 years ago)
a dead Christ with St. Francis and Apollonia. On each vault are newer frescos representing different saints. It is a very modest interior, well lighted. The exterior is constructed of sandstone blocks with a cloister and a quadrangular bell tower. Four columns, resting on two walls, support the porch roof. There is a single arched entry portal.
Paweł Strumiński (3 years ago)
Good can grant you a wish here, but only one.
Faulkner Priestman (3 years ago)
This single nave church, built in 1361, has a 14th century cross in the apse from the original church. On the altar is a painting from the 15th century depicting a dead Christ with St. Francis and Apollonia. On each vault are newer frescos representing different saints. It is a very modest interior, well lighted. The exterior is constructed of sandstone blocks with a cloister and a quadrangular bell tower. Four columns, resting on two walls, support the porch roof. There is a single arched entry portal.
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