Zice Charterhouse

Žiče, Slovenia

The Žiče Charterhouse was a Carthusian monastery founded between 1155 and 1165 by Ottokar III of Styria, the Margrave of Styria. It was the first Carthusian monastery in the German sphere of influence of the time, and also the first outside France or Italy. The monastery also had one of the first pharmacies in what is now Slovenia.

The monastery was settled by Carthusian monks from the Grande Chartreuse in France, which also financed the construction. As with French charterhouses, two monasteries were built here: the upper one, where the cloister monks lived according to the strict rule of the Carthusians, and the lower one in the village of Špitalič for the lay monks, who spent less time in prayer and worked as craftsmen, supporting the upper monastery and contributing to its prosperity. The monastery church dedicated to Saint John the Baptist was consecrated on 24 October 1190 by Patriarch Berthold of Aquileia.

At the time of the Great Schism in the western Roman Catholic church in the 14th century, the Žiče Charterhouse became the seat of the Prior General of the Carthusian order for a while in 1391.

The monastery was attacked during an Ottoman raid in 1531. This marked the beginning of a decline in its influence and fortunes. In 1564 it passed into the hands of commendatory abbots and in 1591 to the Jesuits of Graz. It was recovered by the Carthusians in 1593, after which it prospered again. In 1782 Emperor Joseph II abolished the monastery, one of the earliest to be dissolved under the Josephine Reforms.

The charterhouse was allowed to fall into decay. The ruins were bought from the religious foundation in 1826 by Prince Weriand of Windisch-Graetz and remained the property of this family until the end of World War II. Now the owner is the Municipality of Slovenske Konjice.

Today the charterhouse is an important cultural monument with about 20,000 visitors per year. Reconstruction work under expert supervision is still in progress. Just outside the charterhouse is the Gastuž Inn, purporting to be the oldest inn on Slovenian territory (dating to 1467).

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Details

Founded: 1155-1190
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marika Caruana (3 years ago)
A very peaceful place and great for taking pictures. Also, getting to know how the Carthusian Monks lived almost a thousand years ago is very intriguing.
Gregor Jaklinov (3 years ago)
It's open till 18.00...now is 17.31 and we order drink but they still want 4.50e for entry for one person... Don't like it
Sebastjan Ugrin (3 years ago)
In middle ages home to Cartesian monks who were also well known healers with herbal medicine. A walk through the past with incredible views, a place to meditate and find some peace and relax. You can buy some Cartesian medicinal herbs in a cute little shop situated inside the monastery, also healing crystals... A nearby restaurant which happens to be the oldest in Sloveia offers some local specialties.
Matej Culjkar (3 years ago)
Nothing special, but nice sightseeing and in the middle of nothing, in the cute valley.
Tamara Hartman (4 years ago)
Beautiful, magical, peaceful place. We had a great guide, worth the visit.
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