Maribor Cathedral

Maribor, Slovenia

First built in 1248 as a Romanesque basilica with a nave and two aisles, the cathedral gained its current appearance in the 15th century as a Gothic structure, though the Baroque chapels date from the 16th and 18th centuries. Inside, one is treated to the sight of a lavishly adorned altar, which lights up the place all on its own.

The 57 metre high classicist designed bell tower dates back to the end of the 18th century as the primarily 76-metre high bell tower built by Pavel Porta in the year 1623 was struck by lightening.

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Founded: 1248
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francesco Bertolini (11 months ago)
Prayerful
Sorin George Vaida (11 months ago)
Nothing special...
Attila Tényi (13 months ago)
Excellent great gothic cathedral.
Alessio Mavri (14 months ago)
Maribor Cathedral, dedicated to Saint John the Baptist, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the city of Maribor, northeastern Slovenia. The church is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Maribor and the parish church of the Parish of Maribor–St. John the Baptist. It is also the resting place of the Bishop Anton Martin Slomšek, an advocate of Slovene culture. The originally Romanesque building dates to the late 12th century. In the Gothic period, it got a rib vault, a larger choir and two side naves, whereas in the Baroque period, it got the chapel of Saint Francis Xavier and the chapel of the Holy Cross.
Beijing Footbal Culture (17 months ago)
Quiet,beautiful place,in the city centre
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