Château de Lordat

Lordat, France

Château de Lordat castle dates back to the 9th and 10th centuries (mentioned first time in 970 AD). Around 1244 it was occupied by the Cathars during the crusade against the Albigensians. Lordat family abandoned the castle at the time of religious wars of France. Dismantled by the order of Henry IV in 1582, the castle fell gradually in ruins. The entrance is protected by a square tower which still has its original appearance.

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Address

Le Village 3, Lordat, France
See all sites in Lordat

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

CONSCIENCE (7 months ago)
An easy expedition for families! A Cathar castle that is still coherent! Remember to park outside the village because the streets are narrow! Put the gps to go up in pedestrian mode! Otherwise you will turn to access the free and modern entrance which closes at 5 p.m. Then you walk 10 minutes and the porch of the castle appears.
Josep Herrero (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle on the top of a hill near Luzenac. Gorgeous! Safe trail up to the castle. Astonishing views of Ariege valley
Alexandre Simoes (2 years ago)
Nice hike up with some not so evident shortcuts. The castle itself doesn't have much to see but the view is amazing.
Ela Kuflinska (3 years ago)
Byliśmy tam 1.01.2019 aby zobaczyć jego ruiny od środka ale był zamknięty. Zwiedziliśmy go tylko z zewnątrz no szkoda
r sole (4 years ago)
El vàrem visitar però estava tancat, sinó tens res millor que fer pot ser una passejada de tarda
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