Château de Lordat

Lordat, France

Château de Lordat castle dates back to the 9th and 10th centuries (mentioned first time in 970 AD). Around 1244 it was occupied by the Cathars during the crusade against the Albigensians. Lordat family abandoned the castle at the time of religious wars of France. Dismantled by the order of Henry IV in 1582, the castle fell gradually in ruins. The entrance is protected by a square tower which still has its original appearance.

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Address

Le Village 3, Lordat, France
See all sites in Lordat

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ela Kuflinska (2 years ago)
Byliśmy tam 1.01.2019 aby zobaczyć jego ruiny od środka ale był zamknięty. Zwiedziliśmy go tylko z zewnątrz no szkoda
r sole (3 years ago)
El vàrem visitar però estava tancat, sinó tens res millor que fer pot ser una passejada de tarda
Andy Hanzler (3 years ago)
Fantastic climbing venue in the shade.
Casanova Stéphane (3 years ago)
Site magnifique et hautement chargé en histoire. Le point de vue y sublime. Les spectacles de rapaces sont magnifiques, la possibilité de les voir de près , magnifique
julien rechard (3 years ago)
Beautiful point of view
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