Château de Lordat

Lordat, France

Château de Lordat castle dates back to the 9th and 10th centuries (mentioned first time in 970 AD). Around 1244 it was occupied by the Cathars during the crusade against the Albigensians. Lordat family abandoned the castle at the time of religious wars of France. Dismantled by the order of Henry IV in 1582, the castle fell gradually in ruins. The entrance is protected by a square tower which still has its original appearance.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Le Village 3, Lordat, France
See all sites in Lordat

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ela Kuflinska (7 months ago)
Byliśmy tam 1.01.2019 aby zobaczyć jego ruiny od środka ale był zamknięty. Zwiedziliśmy go tylko z zewnątrz no szkoda
r sole (8 months ago)
El vàrem visitar però estava tancat, sinó tens res millor que fer pot ser una passejada de tarda
Andy Hanzler (11 months ago)
Fantastic climbing venue in the shade.
Casanova Stéphane (11 months ago)
Site magnifique et hautement chargé en histoire. Le point de vue y sublime. Les spectacles de rapaces sont magnifiques, la possibilité de les voir de près , magnifique
julien rechard (12 months ago)
Beautiful point of view
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Baths of Caracalla

The Baths of Caracalla were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, in Rome. It was built between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla. They would have had to install over 2,000t of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. 

The baths remained in use until the 6th century when the complex was taken by the Ostrogoths during the Gothic War, at which time the hydraulic installations were destroyed. The bath was free and open to the public. The earthquake of 847 destroyed much of the building, along with many other Roman structures.

The building was heated by a hypocaust, a system of burning coal and wood underneath the ground to heat water provided by a dedicated aqueduct. It was in use up to the 19th century. The Aqua Antoniniana aqueduct, a branch of the earlier Aqua Marcia, by Caracalla was specifically built to serve the baths. It was most likely reconstructed by Garbrecht and Manderscheid to its current place.

In the 19th and early 20th century, the design of the baths was used as the inspiration for several modern structures, including St George's Hall in Liverpool and the original Pennsylvania Station in New York City. At the 1960 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the gymnastics events.