Lindelbrunn Castle was founded in the mid-12th century, presumably as an imperial castle to defend the Trifels. Prior to that it may have been owned by the imperial church at Speyer. It is likely that the main construction phase of the castle with its palas and separate chapel dates to around 1190/1200. At that time, large halls and independent chapels were only built by relatively high-ranking lords; around 1200, not a single count had such a facilities. In 1274 the castle was transferred by King Rudolph of Habsburg to Counts Emich IV and Frederick III of Leiningen. In the course of time, Lindelbrunn became a joint-inheritance or Ganerbenburg. As a result of the enfeoffment of various parts of the castle, there were so many co-owners that disputes arose. In 1381, St. Nicholas' Chapel was first mentioned in a deed. In 1441 troopps of the Palatine prince-elector and the Bishop of Speyer, Reinhard von Helmstatt besieged the castle for seven weeks until a peaceful agreement ended the investment.

Shortly after Easter 1450, as a result of a feud and the seizure of Hans von Helmstadt, troops from the town of Landau and Bishopric of Speyer advanced on the castle. After four days of unsuccessful siege, Holzapfel was ransomed. In June that year, Count Emich VI of Leiningen-Hardenburg and his son, Frederick of Zweibrücken-Bitsch, besieged the castle, captured it and so ended the disputes.

During the German Peasants' War of 1525 the castle was razed by rebellious peasants of the Kleeburg Kolbenhaufen band. Since then it has remained unoccupied and fallen into ruins.

In 1963 the castle became the possession of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate. In 1979 to 1981 comprehensive remediation measures were carried out which saw the remains of the detached chapel being uncovered and partially restored.

The most important visible remains are the preserved parts of the palas (around 1190/1200) in the southwest of the castle. The outer wall on the valley side is made of rusticated ashlars and has three niches with adjacent windows and fireplace that has not quite been faithfully reconstructed. The interior probably contain a large hall.

From the forester's lodge, Forsthaus Lindelbrunn, it is a 15 to 20 minute walk to the ruins of Lindelbrunn Castle. In clear weather there is an extensive 360-degree panoramic view which also takes in the imperial castle of Trifels.

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Details

Founded: 1150-1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Werner Klein, (19 months ago)
Für mich ein magischer Ort
Bernd Seyberth (2 years ago)
Eine ganz tolle Burgruine vom 12 Jahrhundert cirka. Etwas steiler Anstieg zum hoch laufen , dafür entschädigt die Aussicht oben dann. Sehr schön anzuschauen ist im oberen Drittel die Felsformationen die wahrhaft eine Geschichte erzählen.
Janek Kozicki (2 years ago)
Very nice!
Rainer Harteneck (3 years ago)
what a place the most sensational view
M IKEM (3 years ago)
Breathtaking views! Nice place to take a picnic!
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