Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial

Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, France

The Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial is a 52.8 ha World War I cemetery in France. The cemetery contains the largest number of American military dead in Europe (14,246), most of whom lost their lives during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and were buried there. The cemetery consists of eight sections behind a large central reflection pool. Beyond the grave sections is a chapel which is decorated with stained glass windows depicting American units' insignias. Along the walls of the chapel area are the tablets of the missing which include the names of those soldiers who fought in the region and in northern Russia, but have no known grave. It also includes the Montfaucon American Monument.

This cemetery is maintained by the American Battle Monuments Commission. It is open daily to the public from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The cemetery is closed January 1 and December 25, but is open on all other holidays.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1918
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.abmc.gov

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francisco Navarrete (10 months ago)
Biggest war cemetery in France, impeccable manicured and very well maintained. Splendid on a winter afternoon before sunset. As I reached the place late in the afternoon, all visitors were gone, me being the only one, a great sensation of quietness.
Declan Russell (10 months ago)
One of the most beautiful cemeteries I have ever seen. Absolutely incredible.
DENNIS M. GALT (11 months ago)
I visited this beautiful cemetery on Nov-11-2018 for the 100th anniversary of the end of WW1. My father fought in the Meuse Argonne Battle and was there when the Armistice was signed. It is indeed a very special place to visit.
John Culpepper (13 months ago)
This is a beautiful cemetery and one of the better visitor centers with not only a history of the the war but also a history of the Pilgrimages made by Moms of the dead to see and know that their loved ones were taken care of. Hard to believe that this many Soldiers could be killed in such a short time.
Edward Rogers (13 months ago)
So beautiful—so sad. My grandfather fought here but came home. Many friends not. Misty eyed as I write this Rest in the embrace of God boys—forever grateful
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.