Glenbuchat Castle Ruins

Kildrummy, United Kingdom

Glenbuchat Castle is a historic Z plan Scottish castle built in 1590 for John Gordon of Cairnbarrow to mark his wedding. It is located above the River Don, near Kildrummy, Aberdeenshire. The building is roofless, but otherwise in fairly good repair.

The family sold the castle in 1738, and it remained in private hands until the 20th century. James William Barclay bought the castle in 1901, and Colonel James Barclay Milne, his grandson, placed it in state care in 1946. A local club purchased the surrounding parkland in 1948 and gave it to the state to ensure that the castle's surroundings would remain intact. Both the castle and the surrounding land are managed by Historic Scotland.

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Details

Founded: 1590
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

leanne smith (17 months ago)
Steeping in history, fantastic
Angela Patterson (2 years ago)
The Castle is currently not accessible due to possible renovation by Historic Scotland. There is no indication as to when this work is to be carried out. It is worth a look if you are passing though.
John Harrison (2 years ago)
Attractive location. Parking and good information board. Castle undergoing repair to make it safe so scaffold around it.
Shona Norman (2 years ago)
This looks like a lovely wee castle but it was surrounded by metal fencing so no access, I believe it is for conservation work but no indication as to when this will be completed. I would definitely return once it is open to the public.
Jan Malý (2 years ago)
Beutiful landscapes around the castle. Nice quiet place.
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