Quart Castle

Quart, Italy

Quart castle is a set of buildings arranged within a fortified perimeter, which respects the natural contour of a difficult rocky slope.The donjon (keep) standing on the highest point of the rock, the functional layout of individual buildings, the chapel and the winding passageways, are evidence of an early or Germanic fortified structure, although current architectural evidence point to more recent periods, as do the first narrative sources, which suggest its origins go back to the end of the 12th century (around 1185).

After the death of Henry of Quart in 1377, the castle and fiefdom went to the Savoys, who sold it to Philibert Laschis in 1550, who in turn sold it almost immediately to the Balbis. In the 17th century, the castle belonged first to Count Nicholas Coardo and then to the Perrone of San Martino, who gave it the Municipality of Quart in 1800.

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Quart, Italy
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Details

Founded: c. 1185
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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www.lovevda.it

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Laura BOTTEGA (3 years ago)
...è sempre un bel posto dove fare una pausa sulla via FRANCIGENA. ...noi purtroppo trovato sempre chiuso e senza acqua alla fontana....ma è uno spettacolo il panorama! !!
Giorgio Pinna (3 years ago)
Castello rivalutato e ristrutturato da pochi anni lo lo si puo notare sulla destra orografica arrivando al casello autostradale di Aosta.Datato all incirca 1100 1200 d.c. Proprieta di diverse signorie locali nei secoli e' ora di proprietà Regionale
Cristina Del Favero (3 years ago)
Un luogo magico. Ti porta indietro nel tempo....situato alle porte da Aosta. Facilmente raggiungile. Una facile escursione parte nelle immediate vicinanze del castello. Pannelli informativi vi accompagneranno lungo tutto il percorso.
Benjamin Grosse (4 years ago)
Great views of the valley, nice trails.
André Chaussod (4 years ago)
Not yet visitable inside!
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The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

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