Quart Castle

Quart, Italy

Quart castle is a set of buildings arranged within a fortified perimeter, which respects the natural contour of a difficult rocky slope.The donjon (keep) standing on the highest point of the rock, the functional layout of individual buildings, the chapel and the winding passageways, are evidence of an early or Germanic fortified structure, although current architectural evidence point to more recent periods, as do the first narrative sources, which suggest its origins go back to the end of the 12th century (around 1185).

After the death of Henry of Quart in 1377, the castle and fiefdom went to the Savoys, who sold it to Philibert Laschis in 1550, who in turn sold it almost immediately to the Balbis. In the 17th century, the castle belonged first to Count Nicholas Coardo and then to the Perrone of San Martino, who gave it the Municipality of Quart in 1800.

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Quart, Italy
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Details

Founded: c. 1185
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.lovevda.it

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Laura BOTTEGA (15 months ago)
...è sempre un bel posto dove fare una pausa sulla via FRANCIGENA. ...noi purtroppo trovato sempre chiuso e senza acqua alla fontana....ma è uno spettacolo il panorama! !!
Giorgio Pinna (16 months ago)
Castello rivalutato e ristrutturato da pochi anni lo lo si puo notare sulla destra orografica arrivando al casello autostradale di Aosta.Datato all incirca 1100 1200 d.c. Proprieta di diverse signorie locali nei secoli e' ora di proprietà Regionale
Cristina Del Favero (16 months ago)
Un luogo magico. Ti porta indietro nel tempo....situato alle porte da Aosta. Facilmente raggiungile. Una facile escursione parte nelle immediate vicinanze del castello. Pannelli informativi vi accompagneranno lungo tutto il percorso.
Benjamin Grosse (2 years ago)
Great views of the valley, nice trails.
André Chaussod (2 years ago)
Not yet visitable inside!
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Cochem Castle

The original Cochem Castle, perched prominently on a hill above the Moselle River, served to collect tolls from passing ships. Modern research dates its origins to around 1100. Before its destruction by the French in 1689, the castle had a long and fascinating history. It changed hands numerous times and, like most castles, also changed its form over the centuries.

In 1151 King Konrad III ended a dispute over who should inherit Cochem Castle by laying siege to it and taking possession of it himself. That same year it became an official Imperial Castle (Reichsburg) subject to imperial authority. In 1282 it was Habsburg King Rudolf’s turn, when he conquered the Reichsburg Cochem and took it over. But just 12 years later, in 1294, the newest owner, King Adolf of Nassau pawned the castle, the town of Cochem and the surrounding region in order to finance his coronation. Adolf’s successor, Albrecht I, was unable to redeem the pledge and was forced to grant the castle to the archbishop in nearby Trier and the Electorate of Trier, which then administered the Reichsburg continuously, except for a brief interruption when Trier’s Archbishop Balduin of Luxembourg had to pawn the castle to a countess. But he got it back a year later.

The Electorate of Trier and its nobility became wealthy and powerful in large part due to the income from Cochem Castle and the rights to shipping tolls on the Moselle. Not until 1419 did the castle and its tolls come under the administration of civil bailiffs (Amtsmänner). While under the control of the bishops and electors in Trier from the 14th to the 16th century, the castle was expanded several times.

In 1688 the French invaded the Rhine and Moselle regions of the Palatinate, which included Cochem and its castle. French troops conquered the Reichsburg and then laid waste not only to the castle but also to Cochem and most of the other surrounding towns in a scorched-earth campaign. Between that time and the Congress of Vienna, the Palatinate and Cochem went back and forth between France and Prussia. In 1815 the western Palatinate and Cochem finally became part of Prussia once and for all.

Louis Jacques Ravené (1823-1879) did not live to see the completion of his renovated castle, but it was completed by his son Louis Auguste Ravené (1866-1944). Louis Auguste was only two years old when construction work at the old ruins above Cochem began in 1868, but most of the new castle took shape from 1874 to 1877, based on designs by Berlin architects. After the death of his father in 1879, Louis Auguste supervised the final stages of construction, mostly involving work on the castle’s interior. The castle was finally completed in 1890. Louis Auguste, like his father, a lover of art, filled the castle with an extensive art collection, most of which was lost during the Second World War.

In 1942, during the Nazi years, Ravené was forced to sell the family castle to the Prussian Ministry of Justice, which turned it into a law school run by the Nazi government. Following the end of the war, the castle became the property of the new state of Rheinland-Pfalz (Rhineland-Palatinate). In 1978 the city of Cochem bought the castle for 664,000 marks.