Roman Theatre

Aosta, Italy

The Roman Theatre in Aosta was built in the late reign of Augustus, some decades after the foundation of the city (25 BC), as testified by the presence of pre-existing structures in the area. There was also an amphitheatre, built during the reign of Claudius, located nearby.

The theatre occupies three blocks annexed to the ancient city walls, along the Roman main road (the decumanus maximus, next to the Porta Praetoria. The structure occupied an area of 81 x 64 m, and could contain up to 3,500/4,000 spectators.

What remains today include the southern façade, standing at 22 m. The cavea was enclosed in a rectangular-shaped wall including the remaining southern part. This was reinforced by buttresses each 5.5 m from the other, and included by four orders of arcades which lightened its structure. It has been supposed that the theatre once had an upper cover, in the same way of the Theatre of Pompey in Rome.

The orchestra had a diameter of 10 m. The scene, of which only the foundations remain, was decorated by Corinthian columns and statues, and was covered with marble slabs.

A marketplace surrounded by storehouses on three sides with a temple in the centre with two on the open (south) side, as well as a thermae, also have been discovered.

Since 2011, the theatre is used for music shows and theatrical performs.

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Address

Via Cesare Chabloz, Aosta, Italy
See all sites in Aosta

Details

Founded: around 0-10 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dilip de Filippis (2 years ago)
The Roman theatre is one of fourth attractions that you can see in Aosta. You just pay 7€ per adult and 2€ per child under 18 to see all the attractions.
Dilip - Healing Meditation Music (Meditation&Relaxation) (2 years ago)
The Roman theatre is one of fourth attractions that you can see in Aosta. You just pay 7€ per adult and 2€ per child under 18 to see all the attractions.
AndresRafael StefaniSucre (2 years ago)
?Aosta's Roman Theatre? ⚫located in Aosta, north-western Italy. ⚫It was built in the late reign of Augustus (region from 27 BC to AD 14) . ⚫The structure occupied an area of 81 x 64 m, and could contain about 4,000 spectators. ⚫What remains today include the 22 m high southern façade. ⚫The orchestra had a diameter of 10 m also the cavea (seating section) was enclosed in a rectangular-shaped wall including the remaining southern part. ⚫The scene, of which only the foundations remain, was decorated by Corinthian columns and statues, and was covered with marble slabs. ?The theatre was restored in 2009 , Since 2011 the theatre is used for music shows and theatrical performs.
Ross Clabburn (2 years ago)
Great Roman history that is still being preserved and excavated. Worth seeing
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