Egerberk is a ruined castle near Klášterec nad Ohří. First mentioned in 1317, the castle belonged to Wilhelm who first started to bear the attribute name 'of Egerberg'. Wilhelm was a friend of John of Luxembourg and accompanied him on his journeys. His brother Fritz was given several villages and started to bear the name of one of them - Pětipsy. The castle was then sold to the House of Šumburk from a nearby castle. In 1384 Egerberk was added to the property of the House of Škopek and Jindřich Škopek z Dubé started a large-scale reconstruction. At the end of the 16th century the castle was already abandoned.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1317
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Relich (12 months ago)
Ok
Martin Namesny (2 years ago)
Super
Petr Lukáš (3 years ago)
Super
Jiří Purmenský (3 years ago)
Projížděli jsme kolem a od cesty viděli zajímavou zříceninu hradu... Vydali jsme se blíž a byli mile překvapeni... Nádherná procházka, místo a výhled... Super
Martin Voleman (3 years ago)
Slušný kopec. Výhled na Krušné hory včetně Klínovce a Mědníku. Zřícenina celkem zachovaná, ale nejde tak vidět z dálky jako Šumburk. Na ten se odtud dívá svrchu. Naše trasa z parkoviště od Evženky po červené a pak zpátky podél řeky... super.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.