Old Town Hall

Chemnitz, Germany

Chemnitz has a rare double town hall which consists of the Old Town Hall and the New Town Hall. The Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus) was built at the end of the 15th century and has been redesigned numerous times over the centuries. At the base of the building’s tower is a striking Renaissance portal with half-figures depicting Judith and Lucretia.

The New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) was built at the beginning of the 20th century according to plans by the city’s official architect Richard Möbius. It ties in perfectly with the Old Town Hall. Since 1978, the carillon has been housed in the tower of the New Town Hall. The façade of the New Town Hall is adorned with the city’s coat of arms and a 5-metre-high statue of Roland. The building’s interior is primarily characterised by the Art Nouveau style, with Max Klinger’s famous mural Arbeit-Wohlstand-Schönheit displayed inside the city council chamber.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.chemnitz.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marco Giustiniani (8 months ago)
Pretty surprised. I didn't go inside but externally is something to see.
Alex Totti (2 years ago)
Very nice spot to hang around and take photos. Their market is open on Sundays!
Sumit Milan (4 years ago)
Beautiful place in Chemnitz with a lot of nice restaurants and stores.
Hartmuth Stelter (5 years ago)
Ok
Mark Beyer (5 years ago)
Chemnitz is an exciting city ! Don’t get turned off by some media coverage . The city has a lot to offer . Tons of history , diverse architecture and friendly people . BTW: I live in Berlin ;-)
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