Nordkirchen Palace

Coesfeld, Germany

Schloss Nordkirchen was largely built between 1703 and 1734 and is known as the 'Versailles of Westphalia' since it is the largest of the fully or partly moated Wasserschlösser in that region. It was originally one of the residences of the Prince-Bishopric of Münster.

In the 18th century, the structure visible today was raised in several building campaigns for Friedrich Christian von Plettenberg zu Lenhausen and his successor. In 1959, the schloss was purchased by the State of Nordrhein-Westfalen.

Parts of the interior of the palace are open to the public, as are the parterres and the surrounding park. Inside, an up-market restaurant offering Westphalian cuisine looks out into the large formal garden that faces the northern façade. The chapel may be rented for weddings.

The schloss stands on a rectangular island surrounded by a broad moat-like canal. The island’s four corners are accentuated by four small free-standing pavilions.

The garden front gives onto a landscaped park of some 170 hectares, reached through a formal parterre of scrolling broderie on axis, flanked by expanses of lawn. The gardens and the surrounded woods are peopled with a multitude of lifesize marble statues, of which the first deliveries were made in 1721 by the Munich sculptor Johann Wilhelm Gröninger. Other sculptures were delivered by Panhoff and Charles Manskirch. Further sculptures were added during the restoration in neo-Baroque style, undertaken in 1903-07.

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Details

Founded: 1703-1734
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert R (2 years ago)
Nice area for a walk
NICHOLAS GOTTWALD (2 years ago)
Loved it. My Uncle Christophe restores old castles and churches and he worked on this castle, so it was a real treat.
nigel elwell (2 years ago)
Nice day out on the bike. Lovely place.
Larissa Metz (2 years ago)
Lovely place, offers cheap guided tours with friendly staff
Kris Van Kerkhoven (3 years ago)
Guided tours only. Interior is remarkably well preserved. Tours are very interesting. Spend some time in the restaurant under the castle in case you need to wait.
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