Westphalian State Museum of Art and Cultural History

Münster, Germany

The Westphalian State Museum of Art and Cultural History (LWL-Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte) houses an sprawling collection of art from the medieval to modern periods. Besides an extensive collection ranging from spätgotik painting and sculpture to the Cranachs, the museum specializes in paintings from the Der Blau Reiter and Die Brücke movements, in particular works by August Macke.

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Details

Founded: 1908
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.lwl.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniella H (14 months ago)
Flow was poor but collection was beautiful.
Hyunju Kkim (2 years ago)
Very nice Morden building and good collections and Exhibition.
Richard Shepherd (2 years ago)
Really excellent museum worth travelling to. The Turner exhibition was a real life event to see so many wonderful pictures from Turner and his contemporaries together in one place.
n pyne (2 years ago)
Fantastic museum and worth the entry price of €9. The front desk staff were welcoming and the female staff in the museum rooms were exceptionally helpful and approachable with one exception, an older man who was both rude and verbally aggressive but don’t let him stop you from going. The collections are well documented and translated into three languages, English been one of them. It is a big museum but your entry ticket means you can come and go throughout the day. Backpacks are not allowed and can be put into lockers and cost €1 that you get back. The toilets are clean and there are seats in every room so when tired you can rest and take in the items on view in your own time. There are ramps and lifts and plenty of room to navigate if you are in a wheelchair however, not many of the works on view are at wheelchair eye view. Photographs are allowed as long as you don’t use a flash. The gift shop is expensive which is a shame as I would have loved to buy small gifts to give to people at home and the postcards didn’t seem to reflect what was in the museum unless I missed a whole section. In a nutshell - this is a must see museum with the added bonus that your ticket last for the whole day so you can come and go as you please.
Henry Thomas (2 years ago)
Fantastic gallery. Been several times and it's always thoroughly enjoyable, great selection of artworks. Beautifully designed building, overall a highly recommended attraction in Münster, not to be missed if you're visiting.
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.