Westphalian State Museum of Art and Cultural History

Münster, Germany

The Westphalian State Museum of Art and Cultural History (LWL-Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte) houses an sprawling collection of art from the medieval to modern periods. Besides an extensive collection ranging from spätgotik painting and sculpture to the Cranachs, the museum specializes in paintings from the Der Blau Reiter and Die Brücke movements, in particular works by August Macke.

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Details

Founded: 1908
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.lwl.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henry Thomas (19 months ago)
Fantastic gallery. Been several times and it's always thoroughly enjoyable, great selection of artworks. Beautifully designed building, overall a highly recommended attraction in Münster, not to be missed if you're visiting.
NICHOLAS GOTTWALD (20 months ago)
I have been to a few art galleries, but never cared much for them. But this museum I absolutely loved.
Wito Pfalzgraff (21 months ago)
Building. Edge. Bannana Split. Pic: Potatoe Porridge. "T-Papyrus roll" . Boston hight moma/ guggenhein. Award Friendchise. "Caspar König
Péter Oprea Benkő (2 years ago)
Had a really nice time, wasn't expecting much but it was really nice.
Roman Germanotta (2 years ago)
Lovely museum as mixed with contemporary design and antique pieces!
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