Minden Cathedral

Minden, Germany

Minden Cathedral, dedicated to Saints Gorgonius and Peter, is a Roman Catholic church in the city of Minden. From the year 803 AD, when the area was conquered by Charlemagne, it was the center of a diocese and subsequently became the center of a small sovereign state, a prince-bishopric of Minden, until the time of the Peace of Westphalia (1648), when Minden was secularized as the Principality of Minden (which lasted until 1806). Today the church belongs to the diocese of Paderborn.

Over the course of many centuries, the cathedral grew from a simple Carolingian church to a monumental basilica. The High Gothic nave and its large tracery windows inspired a number of other buildings. During World War II, the church was almost completely destroyed by an aerial bombing conducted by US Army Air Force on 28 March 1945. This almost completely destroyed the town center including the town hall and cathedral and resulted in the death of over 180 people.

The church was rebuilt in the 1950s by architect Werner March. The church contains a number of valuable art treasures. One of the most valuable art treasures is the Romanesque Minden Cross from the 11th century.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Krokowski (3 years ago)
Einmaliger Ort für Mittelalterliche Fans. Unbedingt anschauen.
Theo Thuis (3 years ago)
Mooie omgeving Als je van wandel en fietsen houdt
Ulrike Niemann (3 years ago)
Der Dom ist sehenswert. Ich habe eine Hochzeit in diesem Dom mitgemacht. Es ist schon etwas sehr besonderes.
zanna matvejeva (4 years ago)
Exelent
Romualdas Kontautas (4 years ago)
Is isores atrodo labai senos statybos pastatas, bet dar neteko uzeiti i vidu. Esu mates daugybe katedru, baznyciu, voenuolynu, manau, kad nieko naujo nepamatysiu, nebent kokie kitokie paveikslai, vitrazai, o gal dar ka nors tokio ko memaciau. Kaip tik turesiu laiko pries darba, ar po darbo uzsukti ir pasidairyti.
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