Hermannsdenkmal

Detmold, Germany

The Hermannsdenkmal ('Hermann Monument') stands on the densely forested Grotenburg, a hill in the Teutoburg Forest range. The monument commemorates the Cherusci war chief Arminius (in German Hermann) and the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in which the Germanic warriors under Arminius defeated three Roman legions under Varus in 9 AD. At the time it was built, the location of the statue was believed to have been very near the actual site of the battle, though it is now considered to be more likely that the battle actually took place near Kalkriese, a considerable distance to north west of the monument.

Earthworks of the monument began in July 1838, and the foundation stone was laid in October 1838. Problems emerged due the criticism for design and the financial viability of the project came to be questioned. It was inaugurated not before 1875, in the presence of Emperor William I and the crown prince, Frederick. 

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Address

Grotenburg 4, Detmold, Germany
See all sites in Detmold

Details

Founded: 1838-1875
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

янка орещенкова (7 months ago)
Nice area, natural forest. It's hard to get there by bike, but car parking is too expensive counting little time you'll have there, because there is not so many things to do... The best thing is to park your car in a nearby free parking and than make a day walking tour, maybe even picnic, that would be nice.
R Gade (8 months ago)
Good place for treck. A shuttle bus is available from Detmold to Top of the hill. This bus carries your bicycles to the top of the hill, so you can enjoy hassle free ride over the mountain.
Iulian Iftinca (2 years ago)
Nice easy to access monument. There is an adventure tree climbing park nearby. The parking is 4 euros otherwise great place.
Satvinder Saini (2 years ago)
If you’re in Detmold, this place is worth a visit. You may visit the monument any time with car parking charges of EUR 4. However, visiting times do apply to visit the top of the monument with views of the surrounding vistas!
Peter Stadlera (2 years ago)
Great monument. You can even go up there for a small fee. Nice attraction, good parking area, just fine and interesting.
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