Hermannsdenkmal

Detmold, Germany

The Hermannsdenkmal ('Hermann Monument') stands on the densely forested Grotenburg, a hill in the Teutoburg Forest range. The monument commemorates the Cherusci war chief Arminius (in German Hermann) and the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in which the Germanic warriors under Arminius defeated three Roman legions under Varus in 9 AD. At the time it was built, the location of the statue was believed to have been very near the actual site of the battle, though it is now considered to be more likely that the battle actually took place near Kalkriese, a considerable distance to north west of the monument.

Earthworks of the monument began in July 1838, and the foundation stone was laid in October 1838. Problems emerged due the criticism for design and the financial viability of the project came to be questioned. It was inaugurated not before 1875, in the presence of Emperor William I and the crown prince, Frederick. 

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Grotenburg 4, Detmold, Germany
See all sites in Detmold

Details

Founded: 1838-1875
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ernst-Joerg Oberhoessel (9 months ago)
Unique location in beautiful nature. Recommendation: Starting point for two hours hiking trail at Donoper Teiche.
Milan Tomljanovic (9 months ago)
Be sure to visit if you are nearby
valerios tsournos (10 months ago)
Astonishing statue! It's a must visit if you're nearby!
En Ba (10 months ago)
Very impressed by the size of this monument. Was a bit crowded taking into account that not many ppl should be gathering at the moment but since it's of course open air was still great
Eugen Safin (13 months ago)
Beautiful place. The guy who build it did a great job. Herman the German is very well worth a visit. Quite hilarious actually.
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