Hermannsdenkmal

Detmold, Germany

The Hermannsdenkmal ('Hermann Monument') stands on the densely forested Grotenburg, a hill in the Teutoburg Forest range. The monument commemorates the Cherusci war chief Arminius (in German Hermann) and the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in which the Germanic warriors under Arminius defeated three Roman legions under Varus in 9 AD. At the time it was built, the location of the statue was believed to have been very near the actual site of the battle, though it is now considered to be more likely that the battle actually took place near Kalkriese, a considerable distance to north west of the monument.

Earthworks of the monument began in July 1838, and the foundation stone was laid in October 1838. Problems emerged due the criticism for design and the financial viability of the project came to be questioned. It was inaugurated not before 1875, in the presence of Emperor William I and the crown prince, Frederick. 

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Address

Grotenburg 4, Detmold, Germany
See all sites in Detmold

Details

Founded: 1838-1875
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ein wildes Plaudagei (2 years ago)
Amazing show and all totally loved it here. Was kinda cold though like always.
Shauna-kay Bailey (2 years ago)
Lovely peaceful place to walk and take in the sights.
Wendy Schneider (2 years ago)
Very impressive monument with lots of informative plaques explaining everything. Beautiful park around the monument with plenty of places to sit and relax. Food and gift shops along the way before you get to the monument. Bathrooms are open even if the shops are closed, be sure to bring 50 cents with so you can use them.
Amith Gouda (3 years ago)
One awesome place. A must visit to understand German and Roman fights
Alx (3 years ago)
This place is awesome. A visit here is very informative and brings you closer to the German culture and history. The statue is a masterpiece!
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