Holy Trinity Monastery

Kalabaka, Greece

The Holy Trinity Monastery (also known as Agia Triada) is situated at the top of a rocky precipice over 400 metres high and forms part of 24 monasteries which were originally built at Meteora. The church was constructed between the 14th and 15th centuries and is included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites titled Meteora.

Holy Trinity was built in 1475–76, though some sources say the construction dates of the monastery and its adjoining chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, are unknown.

The church plan is in the form of a cruciform type and has a dome which is supported on two columns. The monastery’s main cathedral was constructed in the 15th century and decorated with frescoes in 1741 by two monks. A pseudo-trefoil window is part of the apse. There are white columns and arches, as well as rose-coloured tiles. A small skeuophylakion adjoining the church was built in 1684. Its broad esonarthex barrel vault was built in 1689 and embellished in 1692. The small chapel of St. John the Baptist, carved into the rock, contains frescoes from the seventeenth century. It was richly decorated and had precious manuscripts; however, these treasures were looted during World War II, when it was occupied by the Germans. The building's sixteenth-century frescoes are reported to be post-Byzantine paintings. A fresco of St Sisois and the skeleton of Alexander the Great adorns the walls.

At one time, fifty monks lived at Holy Trinity, but by the early twentieth century, there were only five. Visitors are allowed. Patrick Leigh Fermor is reported to have visited the monasteries here several decades ago, as a guest of the Abbot of Varlaam. Even then, Holy Trinity was one of the poorest monasteries in Meteora.

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Address

Meteora, Kalabaka, Greece
See all sites in Kalabaka

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wong Yoke Sin (2 years ago)
It's such a marvelous to see these monastery was built in 3-5 thousand years ago. For those who have knees problem don't do it as 250 steps down hill and uphill.
Robert Cooke (2 years ago)
I think my favourite of all the monasteries I visited in Meteora. The location is incredible with great views of 4 other monasteries. It's also worth visiting a viewpoint to get a picture of this one as no idea how they built it before the staircase existed
Elizabeth Kwan (2 years ago)
It is amazing and worth hiking from Kalampaka. Too bad I didn’t get to stay longer since they closed at 4pm.
Ryan Lord (2 years ago)
A superb location,and a brilliant church. But be advised if you are not a Greek citizen you have to pay €3 to enter! But be prepared for a little walk. It's not far, its just the climb up the hill (on the return)
Akhil Garg (2 years ago)
The Holy Trinity monastery is very nice. Fee to enter the Monastery is 3 euros which is not very expensive and You have to go downhill and climb up a lot. Meteora is one of the fascinating landscape in Greece. You must visit this place there are 6 mail Monasteries and Holy trinity Monastery is one of them. Very nice view.
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