Beyeler Foundation

Riehen, Switzerland

The Beyeler Foundation owns and oversees the art collection of Hildy (1922-2008) and Ernst (1921-2010) Beyeler. In 1982 they commissioned Renzo Piano to design a museum to house their private collection. By building Renzo Piano's museum structure in 1997, the Beyeler Foundation made its collection permanently accessible to the public.

The Beyeler Foundation presents 140 works of modern classics, including 23 Picassos. The overall collection of 200 works of classic modernism highlight features typical of the period from Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne and Vincent van Gogh to Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Francis Bacon. The paintings appear alongside some 25 objects of tribal art from Africa, Oceania and Alaska. A third of the exhibition space is reserved for special exhibitions staged to complement the permanent collection.

The culmination of Beyeler's career came in 2007 when all the works that passed through his hands were reunited at the museum for a grand exhibition that included van Gogh's 1889 Portrait of Postman Roulin, Lichtenstein's Plus and Minus III and a huge expressive drip painting by Jackson Pollock. The collection is expanding, particularly in terms of works made after 1950 (recent acquisitions include pieces by Louise Bourgeois and Wolfgang Tillmans).

Situated adjacent to the museum building, the late-Baroque Villa Berower houses the museum's administration department and a restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1997
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eyal Burst (3 months ago)
If you’re in Switzerland I highly recommend spending a couple of hours in this most serene place. Beautiful nature surrounds exquisite art which lifts the spirit and heals the soul.
Olivia Macfadden (5 months ago)
The Beyeler is a great place to spend a Sunday afternoon. They always have great exhibitions. The gardens around the museum are meticulously cared after and feature great sculptures. If you are under 25 entrance is also free!
Paweł Leśkiewicz (6 months ago)
I do not recommend standard exhibition. Not worth 25 chf admission price. But if there is special thematic exhibition , then its different story. So better check the website and know what to expect. Today we were disappointed, thus only 2 stars.
Paul P (6 months ago)
Small collection, but some interesting pieces. Cell phones allowed inside, but no larger cameras. Free checking lockers. The grounds are beautiful.
Tim Purtell (8 months ago)
Such a fantastic art space! One of the best art museums I’ve ever been to. Curators are using the space to the maximum is usually with such a high calibre of artworks too. Can’t recommend highly enough
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