Beyeler Foundation

Riehen, Switzerland

The Beyeler Foundation owns and oversees the art collection of Hildy (1922-2008) and Ernst (1921-2010) Beyeler. In 1982 they commissioned Renzo Piano to design a museum to house their private collection. By building Renzo Piano's museum structure in 1997, the Beyeler Foundation made its collection permanently accessible to the public.

The Beyeler Foundation presents 140 works of modern classics, including 23 Picassos. The overall collection of 200 works of classic modernism highlight features typical of the period from Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne and Vincent van Gogh to Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Francis Bacon. The paintings appear alongside some 25 objects of tribal art from Africa, Oceania and Alaska. A third of the exhibition space is reserved for special exhibitions staged to complement the permanent collection.

The culmination of Beyeler's career came in 2007 when all the works that passed through his hands were reunited at the museum for a grand exhibition that included van Gogh's 1889 Portrait of Postman Roulin, Lichtenstein's Plus and Minus III and a huge expressive drip painting by Jackson Pollock. The collection is expanding, particularly in terms of works made after 1950 (recent acquisitions include pieces by Louise Bourgeois and Wolfgang Tillmans).

Situated adjacent to the museum building, the late-Baroque Villa Berower houses the museum's administration department and a restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1997
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eve71 Binard (17 months ago)
Love the place from architecture to selection of pieces of art. Never been disappointed. Enjoy
tom waugh (18 months ago)
I went there for the Gaugin exhibition last year and the Picasso show yesterday. When I attended the exhibition last year I was told that my camera was "too professional". I simply removed the flash and that was okay to allow me access with my camera! Yesterday, they wouldn't again allow me to enter with compact camera I was carrying but my Mobile phone (with higher resolution) was allowed. The gallery is airy and bright. Lots of space and places to sit and simply look. The restaurant is classically elegant and the prices a bit steep but worth it as a once in a while treat.
Linda Lee (18 months ago)
The building and grounds are beautiful. The galleries are spacious and very well lit with vast floor to ceiling windows adding to the views of the art and country side. Visited during the Picasso Blue Rose period plus the museum's own collection of later Picassos. Overall an impressive exhibit with several works on loan from private parties and museums from around the world.
Kyle Harrison (18 months ago)
Fantastic museum. Went whilst the Picasso the younger years exhibition was showing. Very well done and I hear the main collection is lovely too. Worth a visit if you like art.
The Law Office of Dr Curtis FJ Doebbler (19 months ago)
Reasonably good collection. Impressed by blue and red period retrospective of Picasso's work, but explanations not very detailed considering Beyeler apparently knew Picasso. Still very much worth the visit. Nice basement cafe,but price gouges clients seeking coffee, for which local cafes provide much better value for money and have better coffee.
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