Arlesheim Cathedral

Arlesheim, Switzerland

The Cathedral of Arlesheim served as the main church of Arlesheim and the cathedral of the Diocese between 1679-1792. After the French Revolution, when the Prince Bishop Sigismund Roggenbach had to leave and go into exile in Constance, then he returned to Freiburg in 1793. The building and its contents were auctioned after serving successively as a wine cellar and a stable. It became a religious building again in 1812, and was later consecrated as a parish church of the parish of Arlesheim.

Arlesheim cathedral belongs to Switzerland’s first great Early Baroque church buildings. The foundation stone was laid in March 1680 and the building was consecrated in 1681. Canon houses were built and nobles, highranking clergy, diplomats, artists and craftsman all moved here. The cathedral with its famous Silbermann organ is not only under the Virgin Mary’s protection, but also under federal protection as a cultural monument.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1680-1681
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isabelle Neyerlin (20 months ago)
Es ist sehr Gemütlich dort ,ruhigen Ort HIER. Ich war Beten, wenn man Etwas mehr Glauben hat, kann es niemandem etwas schaden! Auch für andere Menschen zu Beten!! Die es gebrauchen, zur Zeit!!! Es ist eine Herausforderung für mich, dass zu tun! Isabelle Neyerlin
Majid Azizi (2 years ago)
Nice
Peppi Jokinen (2 years ago)
It was so beautiful
Alexander Ball (3 years ago)
this is one big church. though they're catholic here and I'm not, I had a very good experience with the local priest and can recommend it for anyone baptising their kids or something like that. oh and also for visiting and looking at because it's rather impressive and nice.
Verena Kymisis (4 years ago)
Unbelievable. Wonderful serene experience. I hope to return one day listening to some organ music.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.