Arlesheim Cathedral

Arlesheim, Switzerland

The Cathedral of Arlesheim served as the main church of Arlesheim and the cathedral of the Diocese between 1679-1792. After the French Revolution, when the Prince Bishop Sigismund Roggenbach had to leave and go into exile in Constance, then he returned to Freiburg in 1793. The building and its contents were auctioned after serving successively as a wine cellar and a stable. It became a religious building again in 1812, and was later consecrated as a parish church of the parish of Arlesheim.

Arlesheim cathedral belongs to Switzerland’s first great Early Baroque church buildings. The foundation stone was laid in March 1680 and the building was consecrated in 1681. Canon houses were built and nobles, highranking clergy, diplomats, artists and craftsman all moved here. The cathedral with its famous Silbermann organ is not only under the Virgin Mary’s protection, but also under federal protection as a cultural monument.

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Founded: 1680-1681
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Moutinho Pataca (13 months ago)
Very beautiful church well kept.
Kevin Kaufmann (3 years ago)
Nice and quiet; peaceful
Jenny Bunker (4 years ago)
An amazing walk!
Marisa Mey (4 years ago)
Amazingly beautiful Gothic church, a must-see when you are in the area. Special mention is the rare organ that is located in the church. There is also an impressive crypt, and many wall paintings/murals, as well as stucco work. Beautiful to see. The church has limited opening hours.
Karlo Beyer (4 years ago)
Open 7:30-17:00, free entry, baropue cathedral from 1681 with magnificently murals, stucco works, crypt and sculptures. Rare Organ from 1761. Beautiful and impressive, don't miss...
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