Arlesheim Cathedral

Arlesheim, Switzerland

The Cathedral of Arlesheim served as the main church of Arlesheim and the cathedral of the Diocese between 1679-1792. After the French Revolution, when the Prince Bishop Sigismund Roggenbach had to leave and go into exile in Constance, then he returned to Freiburg in 1793. The building and its contents were auctioned after serving successively as a wine cellar and a stable. It became a religious building again in 1812, and was later consecrated as a parish church of the parish of Arlesheim.

Arlesheim cathedral belongs to Switzerland’s first great Early Baroque church buildings. The foundation stone was laid in March 1680 and the building was consecrated in 1681. Canon houses were built and nobles, highranking clergy, diplomats, artists and craftsman all moved here. The cathedral with its famous Silbermann organ is not only under the Virgin Mary’s protection, but also under federal protection as a cultural monument.

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Founded: 1680-1681
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isabelle Neyerlin (11 months ago)
Es ist sehr Gemütlich dort ,ruhigen Ort HIER. Ich war Beten, wenn man Etwas mehr Glauben hat, kann es niemandem etwas schaden! Auch für andere Menschen zu Beten!! Die es gebrauchen, zur Zeit!!! Es ist eine Herausforderung für mich, dass zu tun! Isabelle Neyerlin
Majid Azizi (2 years ago)
Nice
Peppi Jokinen (2 years ago)
It was so beautiful
Alexander Ball (3 years ago)
this is one big church. though they're catholic here and I'm not, I had a very good experience with the local priest and can recommend it for anyone baptising their kids or something like that. oh and also for visiting and looking at because it's rather impressive and nice.
Verena Kymisis (4 years ago)
Unbelievable. Wonderful serene experience. I hope to return one day listening to some organ music.
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