Elisabethenkirche

Basel, Switzerland

The Elisabethenkirche is a well detailed example of Swiss Gothic Revival style churches. It has a 72 metres tall bell tower and spire. The tower has internal stairs. The church was begun in 1857 and completed in 1864. The construction was sponsored by the wealthy Basel businessman Christoph Merian and his wife Margarethe Burckhardt-Merian. They were both laid to rest in black marble sarcophagi in the crypt below the church's main floor.

Today the church is home of the first Swiss 'OpenChurch' or Offene Kirche Elisabethen. The Offene Kirche Elisabethen caters to the spiritual, cultural and social needs of urban people of all backgrounds.

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Details

Founded: 1857-1864
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philippe Jacques Kradolfer (2 years ago)
The Elizabethen Open Church is an architectural symbol in Basel. The construction took place from 1857 to 1865. The interior arches as well as the stained glass windows are worthy to mention. Since 1994 the building is used for spiritual and cultural activities including classical and modern music concerts, theatre, dances, even special dinners. A visit to Basel would not be complete without visiting this monumental church.
Angela Elena Melen (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, inside and outside. There is a small coffee shop inside too.
Pratyush Pal (3 years ago)
Had our Christmas party there and I must say it was very good example of antic and class. Catering and hospitality awesome.
Daniel Almeida (3 years ago)
Nice events place. No longer a place of cult, it's now used for parties and concerts. The architecture is very nice and it's worth a visit just for that.
Mohamad Nasri (3 years ago)
A fine cathedral that works well as a city landmark. The public space adjoining it has a number of glass pyramids that you can walk in between. The exterior is well ornamented especially the main portal and windows.
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