Schloss Ebenrain is a former country residence in Sissach. Built in 1774-1776, it is considered the most significant late baroque residence in northwestern Switzerland. It is now a public facility and the site of an agricultural school.

Schloss Ebenrain was built as a summer residence for the wealthy Basel silk ribbon manufacturer and trader Martin Bachofen and his family. The Basel architect Samuel Werenfels designed the building. Bachofen intended at first to build a modest country residence, but changed his plans and built a luxurious estate. The gardens to the north and south of the residence were designed by Bernese architect Niklaus Sprüngli. Both gardens were converted to fashionable English parks in the early 19th century, but one landscape feature, namely the parallel rows of lindens lining the drive to the house, has remained essentially unchanged to the present day.

Since the elevation of a highway in 1967, Schloss Ebenrain and its park appear to be cut off from the town of Sissach. The residence is still accessible on foot or by bicycle, however, and the route from the Sissach train station to Ebenrain is marked by signposts.

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Founded: 1774-1776
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Hiltbrunner Jan janus (18 months ago)
Ah Jo I be jo gar noni Det gsii.
Florian Schmitter (19 months ago)
Wunderschönes Anwesen und sehr schöne Räumlichkeiten. Immer top gepflegt.
Hans Willems (2 years ago)
Das Schloss Ebenrein liegt malerische gelegen auf einer kleinen Anhöhe, die von einer schönen Parkanlage mit vielen alten Bäumen umgeben wird. Wer das schöne Sissach mit seiner Altstadt besucht, sollte unbedingt einen Abstecher zum Schloss machen. Das Landschloss ist ca. 10 bis 20 Gehminuten vom Bahnhof Sissach (Ausgang Gleis 3) entfernt und gut zu erreichen. Gerade im Herbst mit den schönen laubfarben ist der Park einen Besuch wert.
Claudio Lopes (2 years ago)
Angenehmer Ort. Leider keine öffentliche Grillstelle.
Claudine Erismann (2 years ago)
Für eine Hochzeit mega schön und Romantisch
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